Universität Wien FIND

070153 SE Seminar - History of Stalinism (2018W)

Culture, Politics, Economy and Society

6.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 11.10. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 18.10. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 25.10. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 08.11. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 15.11. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 22.11. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 29.11. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 06.12. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 13.12. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 10.01. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 17.01. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 24.01. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27
Donnerstag 31.01. 11:00 - 12:30 Seminarraum des Instituts für Osteuropäische Geschichte UniCampus Hof 3 2Q-EG-27

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

This course examines the Stalin period in the history of the Soviet Union and the multifaceted consequences his rule had and continues to occupy in world history. Josef Stalin was one the most brutal dictators of the 20th Century who built one of the most ruthless regimes in modern history with global consequences. The Stalin doctrine was a political system that captured and utilized the culture, the economy and the society over which he ruled. Over time Stalin´s methods from 1929 to 1953 came to be understood as totalitarianism. Its principles were adopted by other regimes also outside of the USSR. Stalin has therefore long been a central figure for historians examining the Soviet Union, Communism, but also Fascism and National Socialism. Some historians have even seen his influence so all consequential and total as to have birthed its own way of life -- a Stalinist civilization in the Soviet Union. This civilization inspired fear, but also propelled inspiration and influence across Europe and far away corners of the world. This course scrutinizes the system of politics and organization of economics in Stalin´s Soviet Union. It examines how people in the Soviet Union lived, died, worked and fought in wars under Stalin. We explore Soviet and international cultural projects including movies and architecture inspired by Stalinism. After 1991 historians have gained unprecedented access to archives in the former Soviet Union, and the post-socialist word. This course will study the most seminal works of the new historiography after the end of Communism. Of his successors, Nikita Khrushchev was the first to criticize Stalin´s excesses already in 1955. Despite its horrors, Stalin´s myth lived and lives on. This course therefore also tackles new interpretations of Stalin´s role and significance in world history after the end of the Soviet Union. Against the examination of the history of Stalin and Stalinism we question why both continue at times to inspire understandings and new interpretations in today´s world.

Topics

1. Stalin´s biography and his biographers

2. The Russian Revolution

3. Stalin´s Revolution, Collectivization, Industrialization, Negation of the NEP

4. The Gulag and Stalin´s Terror

5. Stalinism and the West

6. Totalitarianism: The model and construction of Stalinism

7. Stalin, WWII and the Red Army

8. Nationalities policies and politics

9. Stalinism as Civilization

10. The Stalin Cult and music, cinema, painting and architecture

11. Stalinism and its global interpretations and influence during the Cold War

12. Stalinism constructing the Soviet Woman; constructing the Soviet Man

13. Stalin at the end of Communism and the Soviet Union

14. New interpretations on Stalinism and Stalin´s revolution after 1991 in the former USSR

15. New interpretations on Stalinism and Stalin´s revolution after 1989 in Post-Socialist world

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Requirements: assigned reading, oral presentation (20 Min), seminar essay, commentary, discussion.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Reading and participation in discussion 25%, Presentation 25%, Essay 50%.

The seminar is passed with (a) all three components (51% or more) fulfilled and (b) no more than 2 absences.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

1. Alfred Rieber: Stalin, man of the Borderlands. The American Historical Review 106(5), 2001; Robert Service: Stalin; Stephen Kotkin: Stalin. V.1., 2014; Giuseppe Boffa: The Stalinist Phenomenon, 1992.
2. Sheila Fitzpatrick: The Russian Revolution; Trotsky: The Revolution Betrayed; Richard Sakwa: The Rise and the Fall of the Soviet Union, 1917-1991. Docs 1.4-1.7, 1.13, 2.17-2.23
3. Sheila Fitzpatrick: Everyday Stalinism; Robert Conquest: Inside Stalin´s Secret police: NKVD Politics 1936-1939, 1985. Lynne Viola: Babí Bunty and Peasant Women´s Protest During Collecitvization, Russian review, 45(1)1986; Josef Stalin: Dizzy with Success, Pravda, 1930; David Priestland: Stalin as a Bolshevik Romantic: Ideology and mobilization 1917-1939, 2005.
4. Steven Barnes: Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society; Oleg Khlevniuk: The History of the Gulag.
5. Michael David-Fox: Showcasing the Great Experiment; Gyorgi Peteri: Imagining the West in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, 2010; Peter Holquist: information is the Alpha and the Omega of our Work: Cheka… 1997.
6. Hannah Arendt: The Origins of Totalitarianism; Martin Malia: The Soviet Tragedy
Merle Fainsod: How Russia is Ruled; Yoram Gorlizky and Oleg Khlevniuk: Cold Peace: Stalin and the Ruling Soviet Circle 1945-1953. Oxford University Press, 2006.
7. Catherine Merridale: Ivan´s War: Life and Death in the Red Army 1939-1949; Amir Weiner: Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution, PU, 2002.
8. Terry Martin: The Affirmative Action Empire: Nations and Nationalism in the Soviet Union, 1923-1939. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. Ronald Grigor Suny: The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Union. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1993.
9. Stephen Kotkin: Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization; Jochen Hellbeck: Revolution on My Mind: Writing a Diary under Stalin, 2006;; Jochen Hellbeck: Fashioning the Stalinist Soul: The Diary of Stepan Podlubnyi 1931-1939 in Stalinism: New Directions, 77-116; Yuri Slezkine: The USSR as a Communal Appartment, Slavic Review 52(2), 1994.
10. Tanya/Svetly put (1940); Circus (1936); Ivan the Terrible (1944); Burnt by the Sun (1994); When Father Went Away on Business (1985); Volga, Volga (1938); Stalinka: Digital Library of Staliana (online U of Pittsburgh).
11. Leszek Kolakowski; Gyorgy Lukacs; Katherine Lebow: Unfinished Utopia: Nowa Huta, Stalinism, and Polish Society, 1949-56, Cornell 2013; Deborah Kaple: Dream of a Red Factory: the Legacy of High Stalinism in China, OUP, 1994.
12. Elena Shulman: Stalinism on the Frontier of the Empire: Women and State Formation in the Soviet Far East. CUP, 2008; Francine Hirsch: Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union, 2005.
13. Stephen Courtois: Black Book of Communism; Mark von Hagen essay
14. Dmitrii Volkogonov: Stalin: Triumph and Tragedy, 1991; Sarah Davies and James Harris: Stalin: A New History; Stephen Kotkin: 1991 and the Russian Revolution: Sources, Conceptual categories, Analytical Frameworks, JMH (June 1998).
15. Depending on the language skills but for example Modzelwski Wrblan: Polska Ludowa. Warsaw: Wydawnictwo Iskry, 2017.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Schwerpunkte: Frauen- und Geschlechtergeschichte, Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte, Politikgeschichte, Osteurop. Geschichte, Historisch-Kulturwiss. Europaforschung
Dipl. LA: Vertiefung 1 oder 2 (6 ECTS); MA Geschichte (Wahlbereich PM4) (6 ECTS); MA Globalgeschichte: Vertiefung 1 (6 ECTS); ID MA Osteuropastudien M 3.1 (6 ECTS)

Letzte Änderung: Do 31.01.2019 11:27