Universität Wien FIND

140371 UE Readings in Selected Passages on Agama as a Means of Knowledge in Bhasarvajna's Nyayabhusana (2017W)

Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

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Details

max. 24 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Freitag 06.10. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 13.10. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 20.10. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 27.10. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 03.11. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 10.11. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 17.11. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 01.12. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 15.12. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 12.01. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 19.01. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Freitag 26.01. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 2 SAK UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Contents

In the epistemology of the Nyāya tradition, analogy (upamāṇa) is counted as one of the four instruments we have to know reality, along with sense perception, inference, and verbal testimony. As enjoined in Nyāyasūtra 1.1.6, “upamāna is a means to know an object of knowledge, on the basis of common properties” (prasiddhasādharmyāt sādhyasādhanam upamānam). The stock example provided in literature is the knowledge of a previously unknown wild animal, called ‘gayal’, by means of upamāna: by hearing the sentence ‘a gayal is like a cow’ from a forest dweller, a city dweller knows that gayals and cows have properties in common; having directly seen cows, he is able to associate the property of cows when he encounters this unknown animal in the forest, and consequently associate the word ‘gayal’ to its name-bearer.

In mainstream Nyāya, upamāna is thus accepted as an independent means of knowledge. In his Nyāyasāra and Nyāyabhūṣaṇa, however, Bhāsarvajña (9th–10th century CE) argues that upamāna is nothing but a form of verbal testimony (śabdapramāṇa). While going against the mainstream tradition of Nyāya of his times, however, he devised creative arguments to show how his view does not actually deviate from Gautama’s original one. His peculiarly heterodox stance is quite intriguing, not only because it is a rare expression of open dissent against one’s tradition, but also because one would expect a reduction of upamāna to inference, rather than to verbal testimony.

Queries

• How reliable is the printed edition of the Nyāyabhūṣaṇa (NBhū)?
• Why is upamāna accepted as an independent means of knowledge in mainstream Nyāya?
• Why is upamāna so rarely used in Nyāya literature, and yet anointed with an independent epistemological status?
• Were there ever other examples produced, besides ‘a gayal is like a cow’?
• What is the role of upamāna in Nyāya inferences? Is this related to the logical role of analogy in inductive arguments?
• Why could Bhāsarvajña not accept upamāna?
• Why does Bhāsarvajña explains upamāna as verbal testimony, and not to as inference, as others have done?

Activities and aims

During the course we will read and discuss the arguments in the relevant passages of the Nyāyasāra and Nyāyabhūṣaṇa (NBhū, pp. 417–427), with particular attention to the following:

• Refining reading skills of Sanskrit texts
• Learning about the nuances of inference and verbal testimony
• Assessing the philological value of the edition and the manuscripts of the Nyāyabhūṣaṇa.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Requirements

The course will be held in English. Good knowledge of Sanskrit is a necessary requirement.

Prüfungsstoff

• An English translation of a short passage of the Nyāyabhūṣaṇa.
• Open questions about the history of the ideas contained in the passages read during the course, about their philosophical contents, and about philological and hermeneutic aspects discussed during the course.

Literatur

Franco, Eli (2016). “Why Isn’t “Comparison” a Means of Knowledge? Bhāsarvajña on Upamāna”. In: Around Abhinavagupta: Aspects of the Intellectual History of Kashmir from the 9th to the 11th Centuries. Ed. by Eli Franco and Isabelle Ratié. Vol. 6. Leipziger Studien zu Kultur und Geschichte Süd- und Zentralasiens. Proceedings of the Abhinavagupta conference, Leipzig 2013. Berlin: LIT Verlag.

Narayanan, T.K. (1992) Nyāyasāra of Bhāsarvajña (A Critical Study). New Delhi: Mittal Publications

Oberhammer, Gerhard (1984) Wahrheit und Transzendenz. Wien: Verlag der OEAW

Potter, Karl H., ed. (1977) Indian Metaphysics and Epistemology: the tradition of Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika up to Gaṅgeśa. Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies, vol. 2. Princeton, Delhi: Princeton University Press, Motilal Banarsidass

Svamii Yogindrananda, ed. (1968) [NBhū]. Nyāyabhūṣaṇa of Bhāsarvajña. With explanatory gloss in Sanskrit by the editor. Vārāṇasī: Ṣaḍdarśana Prakāśana Pratiṣṭhānam

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

MASK3a (UE a), MATB3b

Letzte Änderung: Fr 06.10.2017 12:49