Universität Wien FIND

Kehren Sie für das Sommersemester 2022 nach Wien zurück. Wir planen Lehre überwiegend vor Ort, um den persönlichen Austausch zu fördern. Digitale und gemischte Lehrveranstaltungen haben wir für Sie in u:find gekennzeichnet.

Es kann COVID-19-bedingt kurzfristig zu Änderungen kommen (z.B. einzelne Termine digital). Informieren Sie sich laufend in u:find und checken Sie regelmäßig Ihre E-Mails.

Lesen Sie bitte die Informationen auf https://studieren.univie.ac.at/info.

150025 PS MA - Proseminar PR (Politik, Ökonomie und Recht) (M2) (2020W)

6.00 ECTS (1.00 SWS), SPL 15 - Ostasienwissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

On November 27th we will meet online. It is expected that the whole course will be held online.

Freitag 27.11. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 04.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 11.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 18.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 08.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 15.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 22.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Freitag 29.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Title: Conflict in a Family: Anthropological Perspectives to the Everyday State Relationship and Law in Contemporary China

The aim of the course is to develop the skills needed to come up with a research question and related theoretical frameworks and methodologies. The course will also encourage the use of both Chinese and English language materials.

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This course is a social sciences approach to the study of law and politics in contemporary China, in large part from the perspectives of the everyday lives of people living in China. It starts off by considering situations of family and community conflict as moments when values and regulations can become particularly visible, and asks: what roles do politics, law and the state have in people’s everyday, including in family matters? What are the moving boundaries between what is private and where the state can become involved?

One section of the readings for this course will be drawn from recent and classical works in social anthropology on China, regarding such themes as family relations, elderly care, property, and gender and the law. More broadly, the idea of ‘tradition’ and ‘rural culture’ as being both obstacles to ‘modernity’ and ‘progress’ as well as sources of so called ‘true Chineseness’ will be explored in the context of the ongoing reforms. Another section of the readings will be drawn from Chinese legal scholars and anthropologists of law.

In addition to academic social sciences resources, this course will also utilise some field materials, collected by the instructor, such as policy and legal documents and public circulars. This will allow for some discussion on style, vocabulary, and modes of reasoning in the texts and conversations, depending also on the interests of the class. It is also encouraged that students bring current examples of the topics discussed to share with the group (or include it in the presentation). This can include multimedia sources such as podcasts, films or blogposts in English or Chinese.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

40% Final term paper (15 pages)
25% Regular participation and preparation for discussion in class. If you miss class more than twice you cannot be graded on class participation
35% Class Presentation (individual, 20min each)

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Regular participation, presentation, and final paper, with the average of all three grades deciding the final grade.

Prüfungsstoff

Topics for presentations and the final term paper will be listed on moodle.

Literatur

(1) Huang, P.C.C. (2015). "Morality and Law in China, Past and Present". Modern China, 41:1, .3–39.
(2)苏力著 (2000)。《送法下乡 : 中国基层司法制度硏究》。北京市 : 中国政法大学出版社。
(3) Cohen, M.L. (2005). "Kinship, contract, community, and State: Anthropological Perspectives on China". Stanford: Stanford University Press.
(4) Steinmüller, H. (2017). "Concealing and Revealing Senses of Justice in Rural China", in Brandtstädter, S. and Steinmüller, H., (eds.) "Popular Politics and the Quest for Justice in Contemporary China". Routledge.
(5) Hong Fincher, L. (2014). "Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China". London: Zed Books.
(6) Pia, A. E. (2016). "“We Follow Reason, Not the Law:” Disavowing the Law in Rural China". PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review, Vol.39(2), pp.276-293.
(7) Yan, Y. (2003). "Private Life Under Socialism: Love, Intimacy, and Family Change in a Chinese village, 1949-1999". Stanford: Stanford University Press.
*** further readings for each seminar will be posted on moodle.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

PR 410

Letzte Änderung: Mi 25.11.2020 14:28