Universität Wien FIND

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150098 SE Interpretationsseminar (M3) (2020W)

Proteste in den chinesischen Medien

15.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 15 - Ostasienwissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Deutsch, Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

This course will be taught on site as long as the number of registered students does not exceed the capacity of the room. If you belong to a Covid-19 risk group, are under quarantine, face entry restrictions etc. you may participate online. In this case, please communicate with the instructor. Should the government and university policy change, the course may change to digital teaching at any time. https://studieren.univie.ac.at/home-learning/

Donnerstag 08.10. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 15.10. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 22.10. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 29.10. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 05.11. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 12.11. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 19.11. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 26.11. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 03.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 10.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 17.12. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 07.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 14.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 21.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05
Donnerstag 28.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum Ostasienwissenschaften 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2I-O1-05

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Update (3/11/2020): Due to new restrictions, until further notice teaching is changed to digital-only!

China is characterized by a seemingly paradoxical co-existence of a one-party authoritarian regime and a society that is considerably contentious. This course aims to provide a better understanding of how China’s contentious authoritarianism works. The first part of the class will cover key publications from the literature on contentious politics in China, identifying different analytical perspectives and research gaps. In the second part of the course, students will develop their own research projects. The instructor will provide students with a coded dataset of over 3,100 protests in three Chinese megacities between 2014 and 2016, including the original materials. Based on research interests, students may select well documented cases from the materials underlying the dataset, collect additional materials, and conduct single or multiple case studies focusing on issues such as mobilization, state responses, or protest communication. Depending on interest and methodological skills, the dataset can also be used for supplementary quantitative illustrations.

This course will be taught on site as long as the number of registered students does not exceed the capacity of the room. If you belong to a Covid-19 risk group, are under quarantine, face entry restrictions etc. you may participate online. In this case, please communicate with the instructor. Should the government and university policy change, the course may change to digital teaching at any time.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Attendance (incl. online) 10 %
Presentations and participation (incl. online) 25 %
Research proposal 20 %
Term paper 45 %

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Points Grade
100-91 1
90 - 81 2
80 - 66 3
65 - 51 4
50 - 0 5

The final grade will be computed according to the relative weight of the subgrades. To pass the course, you have to reach at least 51 points in the final grade, and submit all assignments.

Submission deadlines of presentation materials, proposal and term paper will be set during the course and announced in writing via moodle. Late submissions will lead to a 3-point deduction per day. [Late submission of presentation materials will lead to a 5-point deduction per day. UPDATE 8.10.2020]

Regular attendance is required. One absence per term is allowed, additional absences will lead to grade deductions for attendance. If you miss more than three sessions without proper documentation, you will fail the class.

You have to attend the first session. If you are unable to attend, you must contact the instructor beforehand and in writing.

Prüfungsstoff

See above.

Literatur

Chen, Chih-jou, and Yongshun Cai. Forthcoming. “Upward Targeting and Social Protests in China.” Journal of Contemporary China.
Deng, Yanhua, and Kevin O’Brien. 2013. “Relational Repression in China: Using Social Ties to Demobilize Protesters.” The China Quarterly 215: 533–52. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0305741013000714.
Elfstrom, Manfred. 2019. “Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: Chinese State Reactions to Labour Unrest.” The China Quarterly 240 (December): 855–79. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0305741019000067.
Göbel, Christian. Forthcoming. “The Political Logic of Protest Repression in China.” Journal of Contemporary China.
Lee, Ching Kwan, and Yonghong Zhang. 2013. “The Power of Instability: Unraveling the Microfoundations of Bargained Authoritarianism in China.” American Journal of Sociology 118 (6): 1475–1508. https://doi.org/10.1086/670802.
O’Brien, Kevin J. 1996. “Rightful Resistance.” World Politics 49 (1): 31–55.
Ong, Lynette H. 2018. “‘Thugs-for-Hire’: Subcontracting of State Coercion and State Capacity in China.” Perspectives on Politics 16 (3): 680–95. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1537592718000981.
Steinhardt, H. Christoph. 2017. “Discursive Accommodation: Popular Protest and Strategic Elite Responses in China.” European Political Science Review 9 (4): 539–60.
Steinhardt, H. Christoph, and Fengshi Wu. 2016. “In the Name of the Public: Environmental Protest and the Changing Landscape of Popular Contention in China.” The China Journal 75: 61–82. https://doi.org/10.1086/684010.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

GG/LK/PR 423

Letzte Änderung: Di 03.11.2020 11:29