Universität Wien FIND
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150127 SE Realism and Modern Chinese Theatre (M3 LK) (2022S)

From Realist Drama to Postsocialist Theatre of the Real

10.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 15 - Ostasienwissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 30 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Kein Termin am Donnerstag 09.06.2022

Donnerstag 03.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 10.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 17.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 24.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 31.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 07.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 28.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 05.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 12.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 19.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 02.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 09.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 23.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Donnerstag 30.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

This seminar centres on the relationship between theatre and realism in China since the twentieth-century to investigate shifting descriptions of reality and the real across historical eras and political regimes. Aims include reflecting on the representation and performance of ethical and ideological change, social transformation, and processes of identity formation and interrogating projections and (self-)perceptions of Chinese reality – or realities – both on the theatrical stage and on the stage of domestic politics and international relations at different stages of socioeconomic development. Furthermore, participants will assess how reality is imagined, dramatized, documented, and reproduced through the different prisms of gender, class, ethnicity, ethics, dichotomies of tradition and modernity, urban and rural, and with respect to issues of nationalism, Westernization, cross-culturalism, and globalization – among others.

The course will encourage participants to think critically about the ideological construction of reality as it is reproduced through stage images and embodied in live performance, and to identify divergent, conflicting and, at times, paradoxical definitions of notions of authenticity, truth, and of what constitutes the real at different times and for different communities of interest throughout the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries.

The analysis of selected play scripts and theatrical productions from different genres, styles, and stages of Chinese theatre history will show how concepts of realism in literary discourse and dramatic theory changed radically along with radical ideological and institutional change – from the Westernized modernity of the early Republican period to the rise of socialist aesthetics with the founding of the People’s Republic of China, through the utopianism of the Cultural Revolution to the experiments of the reform era, and further into the globalized realities of the new millennium.

The course is divided into thematic blocks and alternates the study of classics of twentieth-century realism with the analysis of twenty-first century adaptations and avant-garde reinterpretations of those canonical texts. The purpose is to identify and assess elements of continuity and change both in terms of literary and aesthetic formulations of realism in China and with respect to perceptions of identity, society, and the real across the two centuries. Topics include May-Fourth realism, Ibsenism, and the “Chinese Noras”; the canonization and deconstruction of China’s realist classics; socialist realism and Beijing-style spoken drama (huaju); revolutionary realism and the “model works” (yangbanxi) of the Cultural Revolution; documentary realism and theatre of the real in postsocialist China.

Course materials will be provided on Moodle at the start of the course and include play scripts, video-recordings of theatrical productions, documentaries, interviews and other audio-visual resources, archival documents, scholarly analyses, and media reviews.

Upon successful completion of the course, participants will have acquired a foundation in the history of modern Chinese drama and familiarized themselves with styles, theories, and critiques of realism and other aesthetic paradigms. They will have enhanced their ability to interpret a range of literary and visual texts and understand their sociological as well as ideological implications.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

-- Attendance, preparation, peer feedback, active participation (including online, with cameras on, in the event of remote delivery) 20%
-- Presentations (reading reports; text and performance analysis) 20%
-- Short presentation of seminar paper plan (PPT with preliminary bibliography) 15%
-- Final written paper (10-12 pages) 45%

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

The seminar is conducted in English, but students can write their final papers in either English or German.

Core viewings and readings such as play scripts, performance video-recordings, documentaries, and interviews will be made available in (or subtitled in) English, Chinese, or both languages. Secondary sources in English and Chinese will be provided via the e-learning platform (Moodle). Sinology students who take this seminar should be able to read and analyse Chinese-language texts such as excerpts of play scripts, audio-visual materials, production transcripts, performance reviews, and scholarly criticism. These students are also encouraged to reference Chinese-language sources in the final written paper.

Each seminar session consists of a brief introduction followed by presentations and group discussion. The purpose of the introduction is to contextualize the main topic of the session, whereas the presentations and discussion focus on the analysis of play scripts, performance video-recordings and related materials assigned for independent viewing and reading ahead of each session. Participant should take a collaborative and interactive approach. Regular attendance, preparation of seminar materials (readings, viewings) and active participation are essential and count for 20% of the final grade.

A maximum of 3 unjustified absences (three sessions) is allowed.

Participants are required to give regular presentations on the assigned reading and viewing materials. These count for 20% of the final grade. In the final week(s) of the course, they will also give a short presentation on their preliminary plans for the final written paper (with preliminary bibliography). This counts for 15% of the final grade.

Depending on class size, seminar presentations will be delivered individually or in a group. The short presentation is an individual presentation. In both cases, students who do not wish to present orally have the option of showing a pre-recorded slideshow or video presentation. Detailed guidelines will be given at the start of the course.

The final seminar paper counts for 45% of the final grade. It can either build on the content of the presentation or address a new topic chosen by the student and agreed with the course leader.

All assignments must be fulfilled to attain a positive overall grade. The final written paper must be passed to pass the course, regardless of the partial grades achieved in the other partial assignments.

Late submission penalties: One full grade will be deducted for each
week (or part of a week) of delay, i.e., up to 1 week: -1, up to 2 weeks: -2, and so forth.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

Cao, Kefei, Sabine Heymann, and Christoph Lepschy. ed. Zeitgenössisches Theater in China. Berlin: Alexander Verlag, 2017.
Chen, Xiaomei. Acting the Right Part: Political Theater and Popular Drama in Contemporary China. University of Hawai'i Press, 2002.
---. ed. The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Fei, Faye C. ed. Chinese Theories of Theater and Performance from Confucius to the Present. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2002.
Ferrari, Rossella. Pop Goes the Avant-garde: Experimental Theatre in Contemporary China. London: Seagull Books/U of Chicago Press, 2012.
Li Ruru. ed. Staging China: New Theatres in the Twenty-First Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.
Zhao Chuan and Jörg Huber. ed. The Body at Stake: Experiments in Chinese Contemporary Art and Theatre. Bielefeld: Transcript, 2014.

*** A detailed syllabus and reading list will be provided on Moodle at the start of the course.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

LK 421/422

Letzte Änderung: Do 03.03.2022 15:48