Universität Wien FIND

360012 DR Moral issues since Vaticanum II (2018W)

Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Details

Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Dienstag 02.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 09.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 16.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 23.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 30.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 06.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 13.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 20.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 27.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 04.12. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 11.12. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 08.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 15.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 22.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG
Dienstag 29.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 4 (Kath) Schenkenstraße EG

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

The Second Vatican Council did not issue a separate document on ethical issues or the discipline of theological ethics, but it was precisely this area of theology that generated most debates and even became controversial in the post-conciliar period. The first clue to finding an answer why this happened and what does it entail can be detected in the conciliar document Optatam totius, no. 16 which stated: “Special attention needs to be given to the development of moral theology. Its scientific exposition should be more thoroughly nourished by scriptural teaching.” This and similar statements prompted theological ethicists to start working on the renewal of their discipline in the post-conciliar period and this task proved to be much more substantial than most could have imagined at the time.
The primary goal of this doctoral seminar is to explore the topics that were discussed among theological ethicists in the period between the Council and today. Through an exploration of these topics in terms of contents, arguments, methods, and presuppositions, the participants will be encouraged to draw out implications for the discipline of theological ethics as such and to detect, as precisely as possible, what is the current state of the discipline.
Some of the topics (broadly defined) that will be explored are the following (depending on the number of participants): Moral Norms and Catholic Tradition, The Distinctiveness of Christian Ethics, The Magisterium and Morality, The Use of Scripture in Moral Theology, Official Catholic Social Teaching, Dissent in the Church, Natural Law and Theology, Catholic Sexual Teaching, Feminist Ethics and the Catholic Moral Tradition, John Paul II and Moral Theology, Morality and Politics, Change in Official Catholic Moral Teachings, Conscience, Marriage.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

During seminar meetings the students will engage in structured discussions on ethical issues after the Second Vatican Council on the basis of seminar papers that each participant will prepare. Since the goal is to get a good grasp of these issues and draw out implications for the discipline of theological ethics, the student who prepares a paper (for a given meeting) is evaluated on the basis of his/her paper, while others are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the discussion. The progress through the seminar course ought to be evident in the final version of the paper that each participant will submit. Throughout the whole process participants can expect substantial feedback from the course teacher during the seminar meetings and in individual consultations.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

The course assessment comprises of three items: class participation and contribution to discussions (30%); presentation of a seminar paper (30%); final paper (40%).

Prüfungsstoff

There will be no final exam for which students would have to prepare by studying certain material, but the course teacher will discuss the final paper of each participant with him/her before determining the final grade.

Literatur

Charles Curran and Richard A. McCormick, Readings in Moral Theology 1-15, Paulist Press.
Paulinus I. Odozor, Moral Theology in an Age of Renewal, Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2003.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

LV für Doktorat-/PhD- Studien

Letzte Änderung: Mi 06.03.2019 14:09