Universität Wien FIND

070149 SE Seminar - Little Divergence (2018W)

Unequal Economic Development Paths in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

6.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 09.10. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 16.10. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 23.10. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 30.10. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 06.11. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 13.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Kommunikationsraum WISO Hauptgebäude Stiege 6 ZG
Tuesday 20.11. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 27.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Kommunikationsraum WISO Hauptgebäude Stiege 6 ZG
Tuesday 04.12. 16:30 - 18:00 Kommunikationsraum WISO Hauptgebäude Stiege 6 ZG
Tuesday 11.12. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 08.01. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 15.01. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 22.01. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Tuesday 29.01. 16:00 - 17:30 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß
Friday 01.02. 09:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum WISO 1 (ZG1O2.28) Hauptgebäude, Stiege 6 Zwischengeschoß

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Analogically to the debate about a Great Divergence between Europe and Asia, there is, under the heading of a “Little Divergence”, an ongoing discussion in economic history about uneven development paths regarding economic growth and the standards of living in different regions of Europe. It is an outflow of wide ranging research activities in the fields of retrospective growth accounting and the analysis of time series of wages and prices, and it attempts to date and explain the beginning and the course of unequal economic development in the European macro-regions. The industrial and other revolutions at the turn of the 18th to the 19th century are no longer seen as the essential turning points. Attempts of accounting for the Little Divergence range back much further in time now and are centred on the consequences of specific processes and events that acted as shocks within the regional economies and societies. The Black Death in 14th century, the onset of European expansion and colonisation, and a general socioeconomic crisis in some parts of Europe in the first half of the 17th century figure prominently among these shockwaves. Different agrarian regimes, marriage and other demographic patterns, the elasticity of the labour supply, the development of human capital and differences in the process of state-building serve as explaining factors for the Little Divergence.
The seminar has as its main goal the critical discussion of the so far accumulated literature within this field of research and debate. The sometimes quite complex methodology underlying this literature is explained. Participants are guided to develop a critical stance in confrontation with the existing literature, to pounder the relevance of the diverse explanatory factors, and to extend them to hitherto neglected regions. The main outcome are seminar papers (20-25 pages) which will be discussed in a one-day symposium at the end of the semester.
The methodological alignment of the relevant literature requires a certain familiarity with macro-economic reasoning and quantitative methods in economic history, esp. the handling of time series of prices, wages and output figures.

Assessment and permitted materials

Attendance, engagement, quality of seminar paper

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list

Stephen Broadberry, Accounting for the Great Divergence. LSE – Economic History Working Papers No. 184/2013 (online)
Stephen Broadberry et. al., British Economic Growth 1270-1870, Cambridge 2015
Alexandra M. De Pleijt/Jan Luiten Van Zanden, Accounting for the “Little Divergence”: what drove economic growth in pre-industrial Europe, 1300-1800? In: European Review of Economic History 20 (2016), 387-409.

Association in the course directory

MA Geschichte (2014) PM 4 Mittelalter, Neuzeit, Globalgeschichte, Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte (6 ECTS); Diplom LA: Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte (6 ECTS)

Last modified: Th 31.01.2019 11:27