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070370 SE Labour and Globalization Since the Industrial Revolution (2018S)

6.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 08.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum 15 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Tuesday 08.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 15 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Wednesday 09.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 16 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Wednesday 09.05. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 16 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Tuesday 15.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum 15 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Tuesday 15.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 15 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Wednesday 16.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 16 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Wednesday 16.05. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 16 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 3.Stock
Wednesday 23.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 23.05. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Tuesday 29.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Tuesday 29.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 30.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 30.05. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course studies the development of labour markets and labour-market institutions in the context of globalization since the industrial revolution. We examine labour markets in a variety of geographic and economics settings, beginning with the market in the crucible of the British industrial revolution, continuing with developments in the successful economies of the New World, and through to the history of labour markets in developing regions of South America. Topics include the well-being of workers, broadly defined to encompass wages, working hours, labour regulations, and labour movements, and wage and income inequality. The course moves beyond the standard framework of comparative history to study the extent to which international trade operates as a conduit or pathway connecting labour markets across national frontiers in periods of low and high intensity globalization. The format of the course combines lectures and group discussion over seven meetings of three hours each.

Assessment and permitted materials

The course will be taught in English, although there are German translations for some of the readings materials selected. The materials for the course, books and articles, draw on recent contributions in social and economic history. Most materials for this course will be available in electronic format (pdf).

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The course is designed for students at the MA level. There are no prerequisites for this course other than an interest and motivation to appreciate different perspectives of the gains and limits of globalization on well-being in a variety of contexts and circumstances.
Assessment
1) Class participation, 20%. This note is based on the general contributions to discussion in class and a brief presentation of 10-15 minutes of one selected reading to be chosen by the student from the course syllabus.
2) Exam, 20%. A synthesis of the lectures and readings. Take-home exam format. Questions will be distributed in advance. Students will have one week to prepare their responses.
3) Term (seminar) paper, 60%. A list of topics will be circulated in class, although students may chose their own topic after discussion with professor. Interviews will be organized with students to discuss topics. Length: 20-25 pages, 1.5 line spacing, Times New Roman.

Examination topics

To be discussed in class.

Reading list

Richard Baldwin, The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016.
Barry Eichengreen, The European Economy since 1945: Coordinated Capitalism and Beyond. Princeton, NJ: Princeton Unvuersity press, 2008.
Jeffry A. Frieden, Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century. New York: Norton, 2006.
Harold James, The End of Globalization: Lessons from the Great Depression, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Michael Huberman, Odd Couple: International Trade and Labor Standards in History. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012.
Jeffrey G. Williamson, Globalization and the Poor Periphery Before 1950. Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 2006.

The course syllabus presents a detailed list of readings for discussion in class and presentations.

Association in the course directory

PM4: Zeitgeschichte
Diplom UF: Globalgeschichte, Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:31