Universität Wien FIND

150138 SE Political Systems in East Asia (2022S)

7.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 15 - Ostasienwissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work
MIXED

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

The first class is March 4. The first class is March 4. Further information will be provided via Moodle (be sure to check your UniVie email inbox). Attendance for the first class is mandatory.

Given the uncertainties surrounding public health and even university policy because of COVID-19, this class will use a flexible hybrid style of delivery. The class will begin online (week #1) during which we will review the syllabus and expectations of this course. Further instructions will then be provided, but students should expect some combination of online and in-person instruction. As such, students should be present in Vienna on days this course is held. For online classes, please ensure you have access to a computer or laptop with a stable internet connection and working microphone.

For courses held online over Zoom, please mind "Zoom Etiquette":

• Mute your microphone when you're not speaking.
• Unless impossible or exceptionally inconvenient, turn on your camera when speaking.
• Set your avatar/profile image to be a picture of you, or a bitmoji/memoji of you. (Seriously, it helps!)

Friday 04.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 18.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 25.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 01.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 29.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 06.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 13.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 20.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 27.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 03.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 10.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 17.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32
Friday 24.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal A UniCampus Zugang Hof 2 2F-EG-32

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Note: This class will be capped at 25 students, with priority to those enrolled in the EcoS program. EcoS students must also enroll in the Exercise Course on Political Systems in East Asia (UE 150136).

Democracy is new to East and Southeast Asia. Defined as a liberal democracy, there are only three such polities in broader region as of 2022 (South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan). Taiwan and South Korea’s liberal democratic orders are less than 30 years old. What defines a country as liberal democratic, how did these countries become liberal democracies, and what are the consequences of this kind of political rule? These questions and related inquiries will be systematically addressed in this course.

Political Systems in East Asia will introduce students to the definitions, causes, and consequences of authoritarian and democratic rule. Course readings will draw broadly from the comparative politics literature and other sources, but the focus will be on countries in East and Southeast Asia. Based on academic articles, news stories, research briefs, and cross-national datasets, students will accomplish the following in this course:

1. know how to define democracy and authoritarianism;
2. understand major theoretical debates about dictatorship, democracy, democratization, and democratic de-consolidation;
3. evaluate the relationship between political rule and major performance indicators, such as quality of life and economic growth; and
4. explore the relationship between political rule and the COVID-19 pandemic response

Assessment and permitted materials

There are four graded components of this course (% of final grade):

1. Attendance and participation (10%)
2. Class briefing (25%)
3. Dossier (30%)
4. Research paper (35%)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Positive grades (grade 4 or better) for all formal requirements as listed under “Assessment (Art der Leistungskontrolle)” are a minimum requirement for passing this course.
Grading is based on a “continuous assessment of coursework” (“Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung”).

This course requires attendance in a weekly seminar. As a seminar, students are expected to actively participate and, where appropriate or specified, lead discussions. The instructor’s role will often be that of a moderator or conductor.

Each week, a small group of students (~3) will brief the class on a question assigned for that week. The briefs should be delivered in the form of a class presentation and run for approximately 10-15 minutes. Students will be randomly assigned for briefs in the first week of the course.

Based on the briefs, students must then complete a collaborative research dossier (800-1,000 words in length). The dossier will briefly summarize the readings from the week assigned but will also include a regional perspective that explains, in a memo to policymakers, how the issue on democracy and/or authoritarianism applies to Brussels (the EU), Washington (the United States), Jakarta (ASEAN), or any one of the five East Asian capitals (Taipei, Beijing, Pyongyang, Seoul, or Tokyo). Two (2) regions must be chosen, and at least one East Asian perspective is required. Students will report an oral policy memo based on the reginal analysis in the class immediately following their briefs. Briefing and dossier guidelines will be provided by the instructor.

The final graded component is a research paper, 8-10 pages in length (excluding references/bibliography). Students are required, unless otherwise arranged, to write a 2-3 case comparative case study paper focused on democracy and authoritarianism in East Asia. The paper writing process, and especially the research design, will be supported by exercises, readings, and assignments from the Exercise Course on Political Systems in East Asia (UE 150136). Students will choose among the following topics:

1. Democratic transition. Why did some East Asian countries transition to democracy, whereas others did not? This topic/question asks students to explore the determinants of democratization.
2. Authoritarian durability. What explains the durability of authoritarianism in East Asia? Why, for instance, is North Korea so seemingly stable, despite decades of experts predicting its imminent demise? This topic/question asks students to explore factors explaining authoritarian durability.
3. Democratic de-consolidation. Many political scientists and regional experts say East Asia’s democracies are undergoing de-consolidation like those in the West. Is this true? This topic/question asks students to explore whether there is a democratic reversal in East Asia.
4. Pandemic response. Is there a relationship between political system type and the extent to which state responses to the COVID-19 pandemic violated democratic standards or threatened democracy? This topic/question asks students to explore the relationship between political institutions and the pandemic response.

Examination topics

(see above)

Reading list

All reading and supplementary material will be provided by the instructor. A completed syllabus will be provided by the first class.

In addition, students are required to independently research literature on their research and presentation topics.

Association in the course directory

WM3a

Last modified: Fr 04.03.2022 11:48