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180169 VO Introduction to Epistemology (2020W)

3.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Tu 01.12. 15:00-16:30 Digital

Registration/Deregistration

Details

Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 13.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 20.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 27.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 03.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 10.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 17.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 24.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 15.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 12.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 19.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital
Tuesday 26.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Digital

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The lectures will give a general introduction into epistemology, with a special emphasis on the epistemology of perception and the epistemology of memory. Basic conceptions and positions in epistemology will be presented: internalism and externalism, foundationalism and coherentism, reliabilism, contextualism, relativism and skepticism. After a presentation of these general positions in epistemology, we will discuss their consequences in the field of the epistemology of perception and the epistemology of memory. Perception and memory are basic sources of knowledge. Whether perception can justify our beliefs and give us knowledge will depend on the conception of perception we adopt. The different classical theories of perception will be presented and their epistemological consequences will be analysed. The following theories of perception will be discussed in relation to epistemology: phenomenalism, the sense data theory, indirect realism, the adverbial theory, the representational theory of perception, disjunctivism and direct realism. Concerning the epistemology of memory, we will also discuss the central positions of this field: preservationism, generationism, skepticism.

The aim of the lectures is also to make students familiar with the basic concepts of epistemology, the epistemology of perception and memory: intentionality, propositional content, justification, evidence, acquaintance etc. A special emphasis of the lectures will be put on contemporary issues in the epistemology of perception: Do perceptual states have a propositional content as do our beliefs (representationalism)? Do we stand in a direct relation to the objects and properties of our environment (direct realism)? Which properties of the world can we actually perceive (rich content vs. sparse content)? Can we perceive causes, dispositions, natural kinds or emotions, or only more basic properties like colors, shapes, sounds? Answers to these questions are immediately relevant for epistemology: how can beliefs (which have propositional content) be justified, if perceptual states have no propositional content? How can we know individual, singular objects, if maybe we do not stand in direct contact to them?
The lectures shall give the students the necessary intellectual instruments in order to understand such contemporary issues in epistemology.

Method:
The lectures will give an introductory overview of epistemology. No previous knowledge in epistemology is required. Each session will be dedicated to a central position in the field and will discuss its main arguments. Each session will be concluded by a brief general discussion of the presented topics.

Assessment and permitted materials

Written exam at the end of the semester.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The lectures are introductory and do not require previous knowledge of epistemology. Grading is based on the final exam at the end of the semester.

Examination topics

Power-Points slides of the lectures (available on moodle).
Bernecker, Sven 2008 Reading Epistemology: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary, Wiley-Blackwell (the chapters relevant for the final exam will be available on moodle)
Crane, Tim; French, Craig 2015 “The Problem of Perception”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/perception-problem/
Siegel, Susanna; Silins, Nicholas 2015 “The Epistemology of Perception”, in: Matthen, Mohan (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception, Oxford University Press. (available on moodle)
Senor, Thomas D. 2009 “Epistemological Problems of Memory”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/memory-episprob/

Reading list

Bernecker, Sven 2008 Reading Epistemology: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary, Wiley-Blackwell.
Bernecker, Sven; Prichard, Duncan 2011 The Routledge Companion to Epistemology, Routledge.
Bernecker, Sven; Michaelian, Klurken 2017 The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory, Routledge, besonders daraus Teil VII: “The Epistemology of Memory”, S. 281-347.
Crane, Tim; French, Craig 2015 “The Problem of Perception”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/perception-problem/
Fish, William 2010 Philosophy of Perception: A Contemporary Introduction, Routledge.
Matthen, Mohan (ed.) 2015 The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception, Oxford University Press.
Noe, Alva; Thompson, Evan T. (ed.) 2002 Vision and Mind: Selected Readings in the Philosophy of Perception, MIT Press.
Senor, Thomas D. 2009 “Epistemological Problems of Memory”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/memory-episprob/
Siegel, Susanna; Silins, Nicholas 2015 “The Epistemology of Perception”, in: Matthen, Mohan (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception, Oxford University Press.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 09.10.2020 15:08