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400009 SE Thinking technoscientific developments through time: Seminar for PhD students in STS (2016W)

SE Theory for Doctoral Candidates

Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 15 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes

Nur für DissertantInnne der Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung!

Vorbesprechung:
05.10.2016 17:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Bibliothek STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/6.Stock, 1010 Wien

Termine:
28.10.2016 15:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/ 6. Stock, 1010 Wien

04.11.2016 15:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Bibliothek STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/6.Stock, 1010 Wien

11.11.2016 15:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/ 6. Stock, 1010 Wien

18.11.2016 15:00 -18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Bibliothek STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/6.Stock, 1010 Wien

16.12.2016 14:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/ 6. Stock, 1010 Wien

13.01.2017 14:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/ 6. Stock, 1010 Wien

20.01.2017 14:00 - 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung, Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7, Stg. II/ 6. Stock, 1010 Wien


Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The aim of this seminar is to reflect on and articulate the ways in which thinking about time is relevant in and for their STS-related work. In general, STS-scholars often tend to take time for granted, to use it as one of the containers that are part of the contexts of or the explanations for what we study. Emphasising materiality often came at the price of giving less attention to hidden and latent temporalities. Yet time is an essential feature that not only enables us to structure and order our worlds but also to create and sustain the feeling of stability and belonging.
In many cases we straightforwardly use calendar time, clock time, time that runs linearly from past to present to future, to order our stories, descriptions and explanations. This idea of linear temporality is grounded in sociotechnical conditions such as early modern industrialization, the emergence of clock-time, and the processes of individualization. Linearity allows us to order events, to differentiate cause from effect, and to produce futures by extrapolating from pasts and presents.
The seminar is an invitation to think time in multiple and different ways, as flowing in a turbulent and chaotic manner, as percolating into every little element in the world around us, but also into how we create meaning and think about all this. From such a perspective time can be schematized by a kind of crumpling, a multiple, foldable diversity (Serres and Latour, 1995: 59). We will thus reflect on the nature of time(s) in the many different sites STS relates to, on the powerful ways in which ever changing temporalities structure contemporary societies, and on how time has become a central resource to be owned, managed, traded and controlled.
The seminar will elaborate on different ways how to understand and relate to technoscientific temporalities and link it to the diverse topics of the PhD thesis. The aim is to see and better grasp the temporal dimensions present in the own work and to reflect what understanding temporal dimensions add to the understanding of the issues at stake.

Assessment and permitted materials

Course Assessment
To pass the seminar, participants are expected to complete the following tasks:
Participate in 6 of the 7 classes
Read the distributed texts and participate actively in th discussion
Hand in a paper on your own PhD thesis and present it (15-20 pages)
Comment on a colleague’s paper and hand in the main points of your comments (approx.. 2 pages), but also send it to the commented colleague, on the day before the

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Grading Scheme

35% Reading the papers for each unit and participating in the discussion
40% Handing in a paper on the own PhD (on time!)
15% Comment on a PhD paper and handing in the comment in a written form
10% Quality of presentation of the paper

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:47