Universität Wien

430002 SE Seminar for Doctoral Candidates (2024S)

Continuous assessment of course work
Th 06.06. 09:45-13:00 Seminarraum 3A NIG 3.Stock

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 15 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 14.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 21.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 11.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 18.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 25.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 02.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 16.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 23.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 13.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 20.06. 08:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum 7 Hauptgebäude, Tiefparterre Stiege 9 Hof 5
Thursday 27.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This is a seminar for doctoral candidates in any area of philosophy. As usual for doctoral seminars, there will be opportunity for doctoral candidates to present and discuss their own work in progress. But their will also be a special focus on philosophical method and metaphilosophy. This means that the doctoral seminar will, at least in some of its sessions, involve the critical discussion of texts about philosophical method. The exact list of methodological texts will, as well as the number of sessions devoted to methodological texts, be decided by the participants themselves (but I will provide a list of proposed texts to get us started).

Assessment and permitted materials

Preparation of sessions, participation in the sessions, giving and receiving feedback on own work.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Regular attendance, preparation, participation.

Examination topics

Varies, see above description of aims, contents and methods.

Reading list

These are some suggestions in order to start the process (see section on aims, contents and methods):

Andow, James (forthcoming). Intuitions about cases as evidence (for how we should think). Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
Bengson, J. (2015). The intellectual given. Mind, 124, 707–760. https://doi.org/10.1093/mind/fzv029
Cappelen, Hermann (2012). Philosophy without Intuitions. Oxford: OUP.
Chudnoff, Elijah (forthcoming). Intuition in Gettier. In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Classic Philosophical Arguments: The Gettier Problem. Cambridge: Cambridge University Presss.
Chudnoff, Elijah (2017). The reality of the intuitive. Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):371-385.
Eklund, Matti (2014). Intuitions, Conceptual Engineering and Conceptual Fixed Points. In C. Daly (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of philosophical methods (pp. 363–385). Palgrave.
Gardiner, Georgi (forthcoming). Pragmatism, skepticism, and over-compatibilism: on Michael Hannon’s What’s the Point of Knowledge? Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
Gardiner, Georgi (2015). Teleologies and the Methodology of Epistemology. In David K. Henderson & John Greco (eds.), Epistemic Evaluation: Purposeful Epistemology. Oxford University Press. pp. 31-45.
Hannon, Michael & Nguyen, James (forthcoming). Understanding Philosophy. Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
Hannon, Michael (2018). Intuitions, reflective judgments, and experimental philosophy. Synthese 195 (9):4147-4168.
Jackson, Frank (1998). From Metaphysics to Ethics. Oxford: OUP.
Kölbel, Max (2023). Varieties of Conceptual Analysis. Analytic Philosophy 64, pp. 20–38.
Levin, J. (2014). Reclaiming the armchair. In C. Daly (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of philosophical methods (pp. 448–477). Palgrave.
Lutz, Sebastian (forthcoming). Ordinary Language Philosophy and Ideal Language Philosophy. In The Cambridge Companion to Analytic Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lutz, Sebastian (2020). Armchair Philosophy Naturalized. Synthese 197 (3):1099-1125.
Nolan, Daniel (2020). Canberra Plan. In Oppy, Graham; Trakakis, N.N. (2020). The Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand (Second Edition). Monash University (103–5). Monograph. https://doi.org/10.26180/5f3c6d4fa4ea5A.
Papineau, D. (2014). The poverty of conceptual analysis. In M. C. Haug (Ed.), Philosophical methodology: the armchair or the laboratory? (pp. 166–194). Routledge.
Ratcliffe, Matthew (2014). Some Husserlian reflections on the contents of experience. In M. C. Haug (Ed.), Philosophical methodology: the armchair or the laboratory? (pp. 353–78). London: Routledge.
Thomasson, Amie (2017) Metaphysical Disputes and Metalinguistic Negotiation. Analytic Philosophy 58, pp. 1–28.
Williamson, T. (2007). The philosophy of philosophy. Blackwell.
Williamson, T. (2018). Doing philosophy. Oxford University Press.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Tu 21.05.2024 18:07