Universität Wien FIND

Kehren Sie für das Sommersemester 2022 nach Wien zurück. Wir planen Lehre überwiegend vor Ort, um den persönlichen Austausch zu fördern. Digitale und gemischte Lehrveranstaltungen haben wir für Sie in u:find gekennzeichnet.

Es kann COVID-19-bedingt kurzfristig zu Änderungen kommen (z.B. einzelne Termine digital). Informieren Sie sich laufend in u:find und checken Sie regelmäßig Ihre E-Mails.

Lesen Sie bitte die Informationen auf https://studieren.univie.ac.at/info.

040112 UK Empirical Methods of Economic History (BA) (2014W)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 60 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 02.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 09.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 16.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 23.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 30.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 06.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 13.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 20.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 27.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 04.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 11.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 18.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 08.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 15.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 22.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Donnerstag 29.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

In recent years, an exciting new literature has emerged empirically examining whether
historic events are important determinants of economic development today. Can
geography, culture, or institutions explain why are we so much richer than our
ancestors? Can they explain such large differences in income levels across societies
today? While the earliest studies were successful at highlighting correlations in the data
consistent with the notion that history can matter, the literature has moved forward.
Much more effort has been put into collecting and compiling new variables based on
detailed historic data. This allows employing much more satisfying identification
strategies that allow estimating causal effects.
This course will review this recent literature as a vehicle to introduce students to the
(reduced-form) empirical methods typically used in economic history: instrumental
variables, falsification tests, regression discontinuities, differences-in-differences
estimation, or propensity score matching techniques. As the course's main objective is
to build skills in reading and writing economic history papers, I have put less emphasis
on giving a thorough overview of the literature and more emphasis on teaching a few
papers in detail.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Your grade will be based on a midterm exam (40%), a final exam (40%), and class
participation (20%)

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

Topic 1: Seminal contributions in the Literature
Acemoglu D, Johnson S, Robinson JA. 2001. "The colonial origins of comparative
development: an empirical investigation". Am. Econ. Rev. 91:1369-401
Engerman SL, Sokoloff KL. 2002. "Factor endowments, inequality, and paths of
development among New World economies". Work. Pap. 9259, NBER
La Porta R, Lopez-de-Silanes F, Shleifer A, Vishny R. 1998. "Law and finance". J.
Polit. Econ. 106:1113-55
Topic 2: Identifying that history matters
Feyrer JD, Sacerdote B. 2009. "Colonialism and modern income: islands as natural
experiments". Rev. Econ. Stat. 91(May)
Dell, M. 2010. "The persistent effects of Peru's Mining Mita". Econometrica. 78 (6):
1863-1903
Topic 3: Path dependence
Redding SJ, Sturm D, Wolf N. 2007. "History and industrial location: evidence from
German airports". Rev. Econ. Stat. 93(3): 814-831
Topic 4: Domestic institutions
Jha S. 2008. Trade, institutions and religious tolerance: evidence from India.
Mimeogr., Stanford Univ.
Topic 5: Cultural norms and religion
Nunn N, Wantchekon L. 2011. "The slave trade and the origins of mistrust in
Africa". Am. Econ. Review 101(7): 3221-52,
Becker, S.O. and L. Woesseman. 2009. "Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital
Theory of Protestant Economic History". Q. J. Econ. 124 (2): 531-596
Topic 6: Education and Technology
Cinnirella, F. and Hornung, E. 2011 "Landownership Concentration and the
Expansion of Education", EHES Working Papers in Economic History, no. 10.
Nunn N and Qian N. 2011. "Columbus's contribution to world population and
urbanization: a natural experiment examining the introduction of potatoes". Q. J.
Econ.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Mo 07.09.2020 15:28