Universität Wien FIND
Achtung! Das Lehrangebot ist noch nicht vollständig und wird bis Semesterbeginn laufend ergänzt.

040122 KU Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics (MA) (2022W)

8.00 ECTS (4.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung
VOR-ORT

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 50 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

The first lecture will take place in presence on Friday October 7th [i.e. there is no lecture on Thursday Oct. 6th]

Donnerstag 06.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 07.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 13.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 14.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 20.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 21.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 27.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 28.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 03.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 04.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 10.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 11.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 17.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 18.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 24.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 25.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 01.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 02.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Freitag 09.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 15.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 16.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Donnerstag 12.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 13.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 8 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Donnerstag 19.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 20.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 8 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Donnerstag 26.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Freitag 27.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 8 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Behavioral and experimental economics is a vibrant field of research which sheds new light on many old and important issues in economics. Broadly speaking, behavioral and experimental economics tries to incorporate insights from psychology (and other fields) to better explain human behavior in economic interaction. The goal of the course is to give students an overview of this area.
We will look both at questions of basic research and more applied investigations that directly speak to issues that are currently in the political debate. Regarding basic research, we will consider two main topics: Fairness and bounded rationality. Related questions, we try to answer are:
Fairness/Altruism: Are people generally altruistic or selfish? Given some evidence for altruism, how robust is this kind of behavior? Do people really want to help others or do they only want to be seen as altruistic?; bounded rationality: How rational are people? Why are people making plans they cannot fulfill? Will people vote for a rational policy change if the benefits are in the future?
Regarding more applied behavioral research, a broader range of topic will be considered. Among them: global warming, populism and anti-migration sentiments, corona crisis. Generally, we will ask whether behavioral economics can help us better understand the problems. Related questions:
Corona: How can the risk of a second wave be minimized? What strategies do behavioral scientist suggest to mitigate the problem? Environment: Why is it so difficult to combat global warming? Does behavioral economics have a solution how the underlying free-riding problem can be solved? Populism/Migration: Why has populism (e.g. Brexit, Trump) been on the rise lately? According to behavioral insights, how should (efficiency-enhancing) migration be organized to ensure that natives support it?

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Overall, there will be 24 “meetings” (either classroom or online, as well as some online material). The general idea of the course is that we will read and discuss academic papers in most of these meetings. This will give you the chance to practice your presenting (and potentially writing) skills. In our first meeting, I will present a list of papers. Each student selects one (or more) papers that s/he reads more carefully and provides a short introductory presentation (about 15min). Afterwards, we discuss questions of methodology as well as questions on context and interpretation.
We will discuss grading during the first lecture. But the general idea is the following. There are three elements (with 1/3 weight each):
- 1) Participation: Attendance in class (or online) (with reasonable exceptions and depending on circumstances – see below) and contributions to the class discussion
- 2) Introductory presentation: of one paper of your choice (in classroom, online or as a pre-prepared podcast)
- 3) Performance criterion 3 will depend on the precise number of students participating (but the idea is to give those students who intend to write their Master thesis in the coming 1-2 semester a chance to do some preparations for that and to further foster the presenting/writing skills for others).
If you receive a passing grade in all three elements, you pass the course. If there is any need at all, there may also be a chance to do some further work (e.g. another presentation) to improve/substitute one of the three (sub)grades.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Some knowledge in basic game-theoretic concepts and basic microeconomics is desirable. While some knowledge in experimental and behavioral economics is also helpful, interest in one of those two areas will be sufficient.

Prüfungsstoff

As indicated above, there will not be a midterm or final exam. Students are mainly expected to learn to read and discuss a paper and, most importantly, improve their presenting (and possibly writing) skills.

Literatur

To be announced in the first meeting.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: So 25.09.2022 17:47