Universität Wien FIND
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040220 SE Seminar Organization and Personnel (MA) (2018W)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Zusammenfassung

1 Gillenkirch, Moodle
2 Fabel, Moodle

An/Abmeldung

Gruppen

Gruppe 1

max. 24 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Registration for the second group will take place during the preparatory meeting on Monday, 8.10..

Montag 08.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 8 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Montag 10.12. 09:45 - 20:00 Seminarraum 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 11.12. 09:45 - 20:00 Seminarraum 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

The student will achieve knowledge on the role of financial incentives in various business contexts with a focus on both economic and behavioral (or, psychological) issues. She/he will read scientific literature on the subject assigned to her/him and write a paper on the topic. During seminar sessions, the student will present her/his paper and discussion about the findings of her/his and other participant’s papers.
Contents: Incentives and Risk Sharing in the Basic Agency Model; Financial Incentives and Goal Alignment; Tournament Incentives; Team Incentives; Financial Incentives and Performance Targets; Multi-period Financial Incentives and Ratcheting; Financial Incentives and Motivation Crowding Out; Financial Incentives for Cognitive Tasks; Financial Incentives from Discretionary Rewards; Discretionary Rewards and Biased Evaluations: The Case of Leniency and Centrality Bias; Discretionary Rewards and Biased Evaluations: The Case of Outcome Bias; Framing Financial Incentives.
Method: Scientific writing of papers, presentations, interactive group discussions

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Seminar paper 60%; Presentation and classroom participation 40%

The course grading is based on the seminar thesis, its presentation in the seminar sessions, and active participation in discussions.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Successful participation requires students to complete a paper of acceptable quality on the topic assigned to her/him, to make an acceptable presentation of the own topic in class, and to actively participate in the seminar during all sessions.
Assessment scale: Excellent (sehr gut, 1), good (gut, 2), satisfactory (befriedigend, 3), sufficient (ausreichend, 4), insufficient (ungenügend, 5).

Literatur

General reading: Bonner and Sprinkle (2002): The effects of monetary incentives on effort and task performance: theories, evidence, and a framework for research. Accounting, Organizations and Society 27, 303-345. Gibbons, R. (1998). Incentives in organizations. Journal of economic perspectives, 12(4), 115-132. Topic-specific suggested additional readings can be found in the course syllabus.

Gruppe 2

max. 24 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Registration for the second group will take place during the preparatory meeting on Monday, 8.10..

Donnerstag 13.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 05.02. 11:30 - 21:45 Seminarraum 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Mittwoch 06.02. 11:30 - 21:45 Seminarraum 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Short description:
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) means that – reaching beyond existing legal restraints - private businesses take responsibility for the impacts of their actions on social society. The Commission of the European Union (COM/2011/ 0681 – final) e. g. specifies that “ [t]o fully meet their corporate social responsibility, enterprises should have in place a process to integrate social, environmental, ethical, human rights and consumer concerns into their business operations and core strategy in close collaboration with their stakeholders[.]” In this seminar we seek to understand driving motives, means, and social as well as private benefits and costs of implementing CSR strategies. Entry literature to the different seminar topics mixes theoretical and empirical contributions.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

(1) There will be an introductory meeting of this seminar on Do. 13.12.2018, in Seminarraum 14 . During this meeting, we will check the topic assignments. Thus, attendance is absolutely necessary. “No-show”-students may be replaced by students registered on the chair’s “waiting list” who agree to comply with the seminar rules.
(2) Seminar papers must not exceed 15 pages (minimum 11 pica letter size; double-spaced typing; 3 cm margins all around; including all figures, tables, and references). They must use appropriate citation and reference rules and obey the general ethical principles of scientific work. Seminar papers are due on Mo. 29.04.2019. One hard-copy must be handed over to the chair’s secretarial office during regular office hours; a PDF-copy must be uploaded to the Moodle-page of the course.
(3) Every student must individually submit a seminar paper. Each paper must contain an introduction in which the student summarizes the seminar presentations and discussions and explains the contribution of his/her presentation to this discussion. In preparing both seminar papers as well as the seminar presentation, students should be aware that the papers provided in the topics list above only constitute introductory (entry) reading material. They are required to engage in additional literature research. Apart from the university library services, the Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Google Scholar, ResearchGate, and EconLit may provide appropriate search engines.
(4) If two (or more) students are assigned to the same topic, they must provide a coordinated joint presentation. The “working language” during seminar sessions is English. The maximum time per presentation is 45 minutes for a single presenter and one hour for a joint presentation. The sequence of presentations strictly follows the numbering of topics in the list below. Students are expected to prepare supporting slides and/or hand-outs and to speak “freely” during their presentations. Slides and other accompanying material must be uploaded to the Moodle-page of the course one week ahead of the presentation.
(5) Students are required to actively participate in the classroom discussions and should be aware that the lecturer can call upon them for comments at any time during the seminar. In particular, they can be asked to introduce the session’s topic as it relates to the seminar’s general theme.
(6) Complete attendance of each session of the seminar is obligatory. Absolutely no exceptions apply. Leaves will only be granted in cases of illnesses or if the person demanding a leave is required to participate in an official activity of the University, Faculty, or Institute. In the first case, the doctor’s medical certificate must be presented to the Research Group’s office immediately (i. e. latest by the first working day following the absence day). Failure to comply with this rule leads to a no-pass grade. Passing grades can generally not be earned by students who miss more than 20% of the total class-time.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

The final grade will be calculated as the weighted average of the grades for the seminar paper (40 %), for the presentation (40 %), and for classroom participation (20 %).

Literatur

General readings:
Bénabou, Roland, and Jean Tirole. "Individual and corporate social responsibility." Economica 77.305 (2010): 1-19.
(A) CSR motives
(1) Preemption/reinforcement of regulation
Brouhle, Keith, Charles Griffiths, and Ann Wolverton. "Evaluating the role of EPA policy levers: An examination of a voluntary program and regulatory threat in the metal-finishing industry." Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 57.2 (2009): 166-181.
(2) Response to social pressure
Innes, Robert, and Abdoul G. Sam. "Voluntary pollution reductions and the enforcement of environmental law: An empirical study of the 33/50 program." The Journal of Law and Economics 51.2 (2008): 271-296.
(3) Following own social preferences
Baron, David P. "Morally motivated self-regulation." The American Economic Review 100.4 (2010): 1299-1329.
(B) CSR strategies
(1) Product differentiation
Davies, Iain A., Zoe Lee, and Ine Ahonkhai. "Do consumers care about ethical-luxury?" Journal of Business Ethics 106.1 (2012): 37-51.
(2) Market entry barriers
Fernández‐Kranz, Daniel, and Juan Santaló. "When necessity becomes a virtue: The effect of product market competition on corporate social responsibility." Journal of Economics & Management Strategy 19.2 (2010): 453-487.
(3) Reputation effects
Elfenbein, Daniel W., Ray Fisman, and Brian McManus. "Charity as a substitute for reputation: Evidence from an online marketplace." Review of Economic Studies 79.4 (2012): 1441-1468.
(4) Greenwashing
Kim, Eun-Hee, and Thomas P. Lyon. "Strategic environmental disclosure: Evidence from the DOE's voluntary greenhouse gas registry." Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 61.3 (2011): 311-326.
(C) CSR as delegated responsibility
(1) Responsible investors
Chatterji, Aaron K., David I. Levine, and Michael W. Toffel. "How well do social ratings actually measure corporate social responsibility?." Journal of Economics & Management Strategy 18.1 (2009): 125-169.
(2) Employee satisfaction
Lanfranchi, Joseph, and Sanja Pekovic. "How green is my firm? Worker well-being and job involvement in environmentally-related certified firms." Ecological Economics 100 (2014): 16-29.
(3) Top management relations
Cespa, Giovanni, and Giacinta Cestone. "Corporate social responsibility and managerial entrenchment." Journal of Economics & Management Strategy 16.3 (2007): 741-771.
(D) CSR and performance
(1) Financial performance of the firm
Surroca, Jordi, Josep A. Tribó, and Sandra Waddock. "Corporate responsibility and financial performance: The role of intangible resources." Strategic management journal 31.5 (2010): 463-490.
(2) Social contribution
Dam, Lammertjan, and Bert Scholtens. "Environmental regulation and MNEs location: Does CSR matter?." Ecological Economics 67.1 (2008): 55-65.

Information

Prüfungsstoff

See assessment above.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Mi 13.03.2019 10:47