Universität Wien FIND

040229 SE Politikinhalte der EU (2019S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Zusammenfassung

An/Abmeldung

Gruppen

Gruppe 1

max. 30 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Freitag 01.03. 09:45 - 17:15 Seminarraum 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Freitag 08.03. 09:45 - 17:15 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Freitag 15.03. 09:45 - 17:15 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Freitag 22.03. 09:45 - 16:45 Seminarraum 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Important note: Since the seminar is held as a block of four day-long sessions, extensive reading (ca 250 pages) during a shorter-than-usual time (until March 1st) is required. Please familiarize yourself with the reading list before committing to the seminar, as the seminar builds on student input. Starting with the first session, there will be graded take-home quizzes on the literature that need to be submitted in advance of each session.

Contents:
In the process of European integration, member states have largely centralized competition policy at the European level and thereby moved the provision of public services to a significant extent from the public sector to the market. Through the application of the “four market freedoms”, and “mutual recognition” of foreign regulatory standards, they also opened up domestic markets in goods and services for foreign competition, sometimes governed by foreign regulation. At the same time, however, liberalization seems to have unleashed an unprecedented level of regulatory activity at the EU level, and member-states often successfully “export” their domestic regulations to the EU level.
The seminar explores these and other seeming contradictions in regulatory EU policy, using concepts from European integration theory and comparative politics. It provides and introduction to EU policy with instances of market constituting (liberal) and market-correcting (interventionist) policies as examples. It explores the tensions between these policies, their dynamics and potential for conflict; and it examines how and to what extent market constitution and market correction are embedded in the EU’s institutional architecture.
Aims:
At the end of this course, you will
- know the EU’s basic institutions and decision-making processes
- understand how the EU’s institutional setting affects policy choices and patterns of decision-making
- be able to analyse, discuss and critically evaluate selected political science literature on EU regulatory EU policies
- be able to research some political science literature and present findings in a condensed, graphical poster format

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Assignments:
Students have to submit individual and group assignments, which will be graded.
Group assignments:
- Prepare, in class and at home, a poster that discusses existing literature on a research question related to one of the course topics. The poster should be based on at least three papers and present a coherent argument about the research question that goes beyond merely summarizing the papers.
- Showcase the poster in class during a short (5–10 minutes) informal presentation and provide commentary on other students’ posters.
Individual Assignments:
- Read the required literature, for the first (!) and all subsequent sessions.
- Weekly quiz, to be submitted until 24h before each session. The questions are about the reading material and will be available on Moodle.
- Participate in the classroom discussion.
- Extend the poster into a short seminar paper of 3000 words (+/- 5%, counting only the body), using additional literature. The term paper is due no later than three weeks after the last session, at midnight of the last day. Plagiarism, even of a short passage, leads to immediate failing of the course.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

All assignments have to be completed to pass. The overall grade is calculated as follows:
- Written Answers to Quiz: 15%
- Participation in Discussion: 15%
- Poster (concept, implementation, presentation): 30%
- Term Paper (question, argument, structure, sources, references, mechanics) : 40%

Literatur

To read before (!) the first session:

Simon Hix and Bjørn Høyland The Political System of the European Union, 3. ed. (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011). Chapter 1

Markus Jachtenfuchs, “The European Union as Polity (II),” in Handbook of European Union Politics, ed. Knud Erik Jørgensen, Mark A. Pollack, and Ben Rosamond (London, UK: SAGE, 2007), 159–173.

Fritz W. Scharpf, “The Problem-Solving Capacity of Multi-Level Governance,” Journal of European Public Policy 4, no. 4 (1997): 520–538.

Adrienne Héritier, “The Accommodation of Diversity in European Policy‐making and Its Outcomes: Regulatory Policy as a Patchwork,” Journal of European Public Policy 3, no. 2 (1996): 149–167.

To read for subsequent sessions (but recommended to read earlier):

Jacques Pelkmans, “Mutual Recognition in Goods. On Promises and Disillusions,” Journal of European Public Policy 14, no. 5 (2007): 699–716.

Susanne K. Schmidt, “When Efficiency Results in Redistribution: The Conflict over the Single Services Market,” West European Politics 32, no. 4 (2009): 847–865.

Martin Höpner and Armin Schäfer, “Embeddedness and Regional Integration: Waiting for Polanyi in a Hayekian Setting,” International Organization 66, no. 3 (2012): 429–455.

Susanne K. Schmidt, “Only an Agenda Setter? The European Commission’s Power over the Council of Ministers,” European Union Politics 1, no. 1 (2000): 37–61.

Morten Egeberg and Jarle Trondal, “Researching European Union Agencies: What Have We Learnt (and Where Do We Go from Here)?” Journal of Common Market Studies 55, no. 4 (2017): 675–690.

Gijs Jan Brandsma and Jens Blom-Hansen, “Controlling Delegated Powers in the Post-Lisbon European Union,” Journal of European Public Policy 23, no. 4 (2016): 531–549.

Gruppe 2

max. 30 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Dienstag 05.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 19.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 26.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 02.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 09.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 30.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 07.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 14.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 21.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 28.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 04.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Dienstag 18.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 13 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Title: EU in Crisis? Policies

Summary of the course contents:
The policies of the European Union (EU) profoundly affect the lives of people in Europe and around the world. The most commonly known policies to do that are the creation of a single market (~500 million consumers, one of the largest in the world), as well as the creation of the Euro (despite its young age, a powerful international currency). In addition to these economic achievements, the EU has become a serious actor in other areas such as environmental protection, international trade, development aid, international security, etc.
This course will be divided into three parts: the first one will focus on internal policies such as the single market, Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), EU’s social dimension, etc.; the second part will concentrate on EU’s external dimension with policies such as international trade, enlargement, the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP), environmental protection, etc.; in the third part students will get acquainted with issues that currently dominate the discourse about EU studies such as the democratic deficit and legitimacy of the EU, public opinion, as well as what future for the EU.
Completion of the seminar will enable students to have a deeper understanding of selected EU policies and their impact within the EU and at the global level as well as understanding on issues dominating the discourse on the EU.

Objective of the course:
The aim of the course is twofold: a) to enable students gain in-depth understanding of relevant EU policies and issues dominating the discourse on the EU; b) advance students' ability to produce spoken and written analyses in accordance with good academic practices.

Learning outcomes:
• Detailed understanding about selected EU policies and issues currently dominating the discourse on EU studies.
• Class is designed to develop students’ analytical/critical thinking and presentation techniques. Research work and essay writing target the improvement of students’ research and academic writing skills. Hence, students will learn how to:
o Independently produce spoken and written analyses in accordance with good academic practices,
o Raise good analytical questions relevant to topics provided,
o Plan and present own research, and
o Critically analyse and think conceptually about selected EU policies by using reasoned/well-informed arguments.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Attendance and presence of mind are mandatory.
Make sure to attend the 1st session. Two absences will be allowed. Coursework includes:
- written assignments,
- one group presentation, and
- regular participation in classroom discussions.
Late submissions of assignments will be penalised.
Plagiarized assignments count as no submission.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Minimum Requirements:
Eagerness to gain in-depth knowledge about selected EU policies and issues dominating the EU discourse.
Attendance and presence of mind are mandatory.

Assessment criteria:
Understanding of selected EU policies
Ability to produce spoken and written analyses in accordance with good academic practices as well as critically analyse chosen EU policies by using reasoned/well-informed arguments.

Evaluation:
• Short (~250 words) weekly homework assignments/response to the readings (25%). Deadline: noon, the day when class takes place (i.e. Tuesdays 12:00)
• Group presentation (20%);
• Active and informed participation in class (20%);
• Final paper in the length of 2000 words (35%). Deadline: 30.06.2019

All assignments are compulsory

Literatur

There is no adequate single textbook for this course.
A reader for the background/compulsory/additional readings with articles, book chapters, blogs/commentaries and/or other sources will be provided at the beginning of the course. Included are also guidelines on e.g. how to write policy briefs/essays, etc.

Information

Prüfungsstoff

Understanding of selected EU policies

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Mo 06.05.2019 11:47