Universität Wien FIND
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060111 VU Introduction to Environmental Archaeology (2018S)

Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Details

max. 20 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 01.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 08.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 15.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 22.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 12.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 19.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 26.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 03.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 17.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 24.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 07.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 14.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 21.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG
Donnerstag 28.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum 13 Franz-Klein-Gasse 1 4.OG

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Summary
This course will introduce the key concepts and methods used in environmental archaeology, and give students an informed understanding of the paleoenvironment as a contextual framework for research on archaeological and anthropological questions. Environmental archaeology is the study of human-environmental interactions, and the science of reconstructing past environments and the relationships between past societies and the environments they lived in. The relationship between humans and the environment is an ongoing concern for scientists, activists, politicians, and the public. Are humans over-using the earth’s resources and damaging the environment to the point of global collapse? One of the strengths of archaeology is the ability to study how humans have changed the environment, and how environments have in turn influenecd human societies, over thousands of years. Topics will include geoarchaeology, zooarchaeology, archaeobotany, paleoclimatology, geomorphology, and theories for interpreting human environmental relationships (e.g., Historical Ecology, resiliency, panarchy, and others).

Aims
To introduce key concepts in environmental archaeology
To provide an inter-disciplinary understanding of human-environmental interactions in past societies
Be familiar with the use of multi-proxy approaches in the reconstruction of past environments
Be familiar with sampling and analytical methods for generating environmental datasets (archaeobotany, archaeozoology, bioarchaeology, and geoarchaeology)
Be familiar with theories and conceptual approaches for interpreting environmental datasets, and the integration of environmental data and archaeological questions
Develop critical thinking and writing skills with respect to Environmental Archaeology

Methods
Lecture, readings, case-studies, group discussions

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Independent reading assignments
Active participation in group discussions
Individual written assignment (paper c. 3000 words)
Final exam (short answers)

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Students will be expected to do weekly readings and participate in group discussions.
Students will be expected to select an individual topic of research (case study), perform independent research on the selected topic, and write a final paper.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

Core literature

Dincauze, D.F., 2000. Environmental archaeology: principles and practice. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Reitz et al., 2008. Case Studies in Environmental Archaeology. Springer, New York.

Selected literature (will be provided)

Bartosiewicz, L. 2005. Plain talk: animals, environment and culture in the Neolithic of the Carpathian Basin and adjacent areas. In (un)settling the Neolithic, edited by D. W. Bailey, A. Whittle and V. Cummings, pp. 51-63. Oxford: Oxbow.
Bogaard, A., Whitehouse, N., 2010. Early agriculture in uncertain climates: themes and approaches. Environmental Archaeology 15, 109-113.
Brown, A.G., Walsh, K., 2017. Societal stability and environmental change: Examining the archaeology-soil erosion paradox. Geoarchaeology 32, 23-35.
Butzer, K.W., 2005. Environmental History in the Mediterranean World: Cross-Disciplinary Investigation of Cause-and-Effect for Degradation and Soil Erosion. Journal of Archaeological Science 32, 1773-1800.
Gotts, N. M. 2007. Resilience, panarchy, and world-systems analysis.Ecology and Society12(1): 24. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol12/iss1/art24/
Mcanany, P. A. & Yoffee, N. 2010. Questioning Collapse: Human Resilience, Ecological Vulnerability, and the Aftermath of Empire, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Redman, C.L., 2005. Resilience Theory in Archaeology. American Anthropologist 107, 70-77.
Sümegi, P., Kertész, R., and Hertelendi, E. 2001. Environmental change and human adaptation in the Carpathian basin at the Late Glacial/Postglacial transition. In Archaeometry 98, proceedings of the 31st symposium Budapest, BAR International Series 1043. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Further readings as assigned (will be provided)

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Mi 11.07.2018 15:25