Universität Wien FIND

070035 GR Guided Reading - The history, the historians and the human rights (2019S)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Dienstag 05.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 19.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 26.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 02.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 09.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 30.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 07.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 14.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 21.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 28.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 04.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 18.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Dienstag 25.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 30 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

The history, the historians and the human rights
(Guided reading for the summer semester 2019, University of Vienna)
The seminar is an introduction to the different historical meanings of the concept “human rights” but also to the contemporary debates concerning the progress of humanism and the political interpretations and uses of the idea for universal human rights. Before focusing on the evolution of the syntagm “human rights”, the seminar starts with a short analysis of the evolution of the idea of “natural rights”.
The seminar aims to analyze the of some the classical declarations related to the human rights as well as the context of their appearance: the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1789), the Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution (1791), the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1793), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) etc.
A special attention will be paid to the interwar period: the creation and the activity of the League of Nations, the role of the French League for Human rights in national and international politics as well as that of the International Federation for Human Rights, the organization uniting the different national Leagues for Human Rights. In the context after the so called “Versailles treaties” the theme of the minority rights appears to be one of the main issues in European politics (Hannah Arendt). Not less important is the debate about the defense of the rights of communists in the context of Comintern propaganda and the subsequent reactions and overreactions of national-state governments.
The human rights as a theoretical and ideological instrument during the Cold War are another topic that will be discussed during the seminar. How the communist countries did they talk about the human rights and is the articulation of the history of the different oppositions to the communist regimes (Hungary 1956, Prague 1968) in the language of the human rights legitimate?
Crucial for the understanding of the historical metamorphoses of the human rights since the Enlightenment till their contemporary global interpretation are Samuel Moyns’ The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History and Human Rights and the Uses of History (as well as some of its critics, like for instance Robin Blackburn’s “Reclaiming human rights”) and Lynn Hunt’s “Inventing Human Rights”. The whole debate that followed the implicit dialog between these two books will be in the center of the seminar.
Michael Ignatieff’s defense of “humanitarian interventions” and the theoretical vision of Nicolas Guilhot (“The Democracy Makers. Human Rights and the politics of global order”) that human rights have been transformed from “weapons for critique of power” in the “main language of global power” will be used as a starting point to analyze the actual “export of democracy and of human rights”.
Last but not least, the seminar will focus on some of the best known liberal, utilitarian and Marxist critics to the concept of human rights.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

no special exam, assessment according to the criteria described below

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Every student will have one oral presentation per semester (25 minutes) on a topic chosen by himself but related to the human rights history. The final grade is a result of: 1. Oral presentation (60%) 2 Participation in class (30%) 3 Attendance (10%)

Prüfungsstoff

no exam

Literatur

Some of the texts which will be read and discussed during the semester are:
- Samuel Moyn, The Last Utopia
- Lynn Hunnt, The invention of Human Rights
- Hannah Arendt, The The Decline of the Nation-State
and the End of the Rights of Man
- Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann, Human Rights in the Twentieth Century
- The original texts of the Declarations of Human Rights (1789, 1793, 1948 etc.)

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Epochen: Neuzeit, Zeitgeschichte
Aspekte/Räume: Globalgeschichte, Osteuropäische Geschichte, Politikgeschichte, Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte, Historische Kulturwissenschaftliche Europaforschung, Wissenschaftsgeschichte.
MA HPS: M 1.2, M 1.3

Letzte Änderung: Di 09.07.2019 21:27