Universität Wien FIND
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070159 AG Political Education - Inclusive Citizenship Education (2019W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Montag 11.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 7 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5
Freitag 15.11. 13:15 - 16:30 Seminarraum 6 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5
Montag 18.11. 09:45 - 14:45 Seminarraum 7 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5
Donnerstag 21.11. 15:00 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Freitag 22.11. 13:15 - 16:30 Seminarraum 6 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5
Montag 25.11. 09:45 - 14:45 Seminarraum 7 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5
Freitag 29.11. 13:15 - 16:30 Seminarraum 6 Tiefparterre Hauptgebäude Stiege 9 Hof 5

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Inclusive Citizenship Education

Inclusive Citizenship Education (ICE) addresses key issues in modern society through the lens of citizenship education refined and focussing on issues including race, gender, ethnicity within society as opposed to the more traditionalist assimilationist view. Citizenship education which focussed on the teaching of democratic values has now become the political currency to address stratification and divergent modern societies. It has become the means to retrieve the moral order, the sense of community and belonging and the retrieval of social justice.
Democratic societies are facing new challenges, especially in Europe. There is an increase in processes of social exclusion and growing social inequalities. Right-wing-populism and religious fundamentalism are becoming more active. Against the backdrop of terrorist attacks and right-wing extremist violence, Education Secretaries of EU-member states passed a “Declaration for promoting citizenship and the common values of freedom, tolerance and non-discrimination through education” in March 2015. The declaration calls for common efforts to fight against marginalisation, intolerance, racism and radicalisation. A broad democratic awareness of citizens is named as a central condition in the declaration in order to be able to protect the pluralism of European societies on a long-term basis.
A commonly used concept in democracies is the need to prepare active, informed citizens in order to sustain democratic states as we know them. Regardless of the differently accentuated terms, the core meaning is the same: To enable individuals to assess current problem areas critically and reflectively and to participate actively in social and political processes with an education in democracy.
This concept is also grounded in basic European values - respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality before the law, constitutional state and respect for human rights. However, these do not naturally occur, but have been won and agreed upon by people and they are in a constant state of development and are constantly being questioned.

Aims:
The intention of this course is to help prepare active, informed citizens through the understanding and enactment of inclusive citizenship education by students preparing to become teachers. Specifically the learning objects are for students to:

1. Understand threats to democracies in Europe
2. Understand the nature and need for active, informed citizens to sustain democracy
3. Appreciate the role of Inclusive Citizenship Education in achieving active, informed citizens
4. Address current issues in Europe destabilizing democracy through educational approaches.
5. Appreciate the need for intercultural understanding through social, racial, cultural and ethnic integration in modern democracies
6. Develop critical and creative thinking skills in addressing issues in Inclusive Citizenship Education
7. Build ethical behaviour, personal and social capability to enhance ICE
8. Identify how a modern integrated school curriculum can address ICE
9. Make presentations to the class on their ICE research

Program
Week 1
Class 1 Introduction to ICE, IC; CE in schools as a means of developing ICE; topics for presentations
Class 2 Global citizenship, Global Citizenship Education as a form of ICE; Current problems in Europe and prepare for presentation in week 3; Cultural integration and problem-solving exercise

Week 2
Class 3 Critical and creative thinking in ICE to address Current problems in Europe; Ethical Behaviour and self-reflection activity
Class 4 Personal and Social Capability in ICE address Current problems in Europe
Class 5 Intercultural understanding as ICE core address Current problems in Europe; ACCC as an integrated school curriculum / ICE

Week 3
Class 6 Student presentations
Class 7 Student presentations; Review and conclusions

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Teaching methods:
1. Interactive teaching – whole group interaction based on key input from Professor Print that addresses key issues and content identified in the syllabus
2. Group problem-solving – class activities to engage students in group activities that require a consensus position that addresses / resolves a key issue.
3. Self-reflection - The process of self-reflection - being aware of oneself - with regards to personal assumptions that are not questioned and their (unintentional) effects on one’s own (educational) action - are a useful in educational practice.
4. Student presentations – individual powerpoint presentations on key issues raised in class through interactive teaching and student questions

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Minimum requirements are attendance, participation in class activities and presentations as below.

Presentations
Individually prepare a powerpoint presentation to the class on a research topic related to ICE and Europe. Investigate the issue and finalize topic with Prof Print by the end of week 1.
Presentations will take 20 minutes with another 10 minutes for questions and review.

Group problem-solving
In small groups of 4-5 students identify in class a key problem in modern European society and how you would address it through ICE. This will occur during class 3

Self-reflection activity
Review ethical behaviour as a democratic citizen.
Individually reflect upon your role as a prospective teacher in building active, informed citizens amongst your students. This will occur during class 4/5.

Written assignment
If student wish a grade in this course a written task is required that summaries the role and potential effects of ICE in a school curriculum.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

READING LIST: INCLUSIVE CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION
A significant literature exists in the field of civics and citizenship education. The more specific, targeted concept of Inclusive Citizenship Education is more recent and essentially reflects recent and current issues experienced in Europe and other countries. A commonly used concept in democracies is the need to prepare active, informed citizens in order to sustain democratic states as we know them. The literature below enables individuals to assess current problem areas critically and reflectively and to participate actively in social and political processes with an education in democracy.

Select from:

Davies, L (2006) Global citizenship; abstraction or framework for action? Educational
Review, 58, 1, 5-25
Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education: An introduction to the philosophy of
education. New York: MacMillan.
Heater, D. (1999) What is Citizenship? Cambridge: Polity Press.
Ibrahim, T (2010) Global citizenship education: Mainstreaming the curriculum? Cambridge Journal of Education, 35, 2, 177-194.
Kiwan, D. (2007). “Uneasy relationships? Conceptions of ‘citizenship’, ‘democracy’ and ‘diversity’ in the English citizenship education policymaking process”, Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, 2(3), 223-235.
Kiwan, D. (2007). “Developing a model of inclusive citizenship: ‘institutional multiculturalism’ and the citizen-state relationship, Theory and Research in Education, 5(2), 225-240.
Macedo, S. (2005). Democracy at risk: How political choices undermine citizen
participation, and what we can do about it. Washington: The Brookings Institute.
McLaughlin, T. (1992). Citizenship, diversity and education: a philosophical perspective.
Journal of Moral Education, 21(3), 235-250.
Naval,C, Print,M & Veldhuis,R (2002) Education for democratic citizenship in the new
Europe. European Journal of Education, 37, 2, 107-128.
Parker, W. (1996). Educating the democratic mind. Albany: State University of New York Press.
Print, M (2018) Civics and citizenship education: The hope for democracy. In G Morales
Martinez and G Altamirano (Eds.) Civic Education: A Global Experience.
Santiago, Mexico: Institute Electoral del Estado de Queretaro pp39-54.
Print, M (2015) A global citizenship perspective through a school curriculum, In
R.Reynolds, etal., (Eds) Contesting and Constructing International
Perspectives in Global Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.pp189-196
Print, M & Lange, D (Eds.) (2013). Civic Education and Competences for Engaging
Citizens in Democracies. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
Print, M & Lange, D (Eds.) (2012) Schools, curriculum and civic education for
building democratic citizens. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
Reichert, F., & Print, M. (2018). Civic participation of high school students: The effect
of civic learning in school. Educational Review, 70(3), 318–341
Westheimer, J & Kahne, J (2004) What kind of citizen? The politics of educating for
democracy. American Educational Research Journal, 41, 2, 237-269.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Dipl. LA: Politische Bildung (Wahlfach 5 ECTS)

Letzte Änderung: Di 12.11.2019 00:03