Universität Wien

120226 SE MA Seminar - Focus: Applied Linguistics / Linguistics Seminar (2024S)

10.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 20 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Dienstag 19.03. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 09.04. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 16.04. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 23.04. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 30.04. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 07.05. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Dienstag 14.05. 14:15 - 15:45 Besprechungsraum Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O2-07
Dienstag 28.05. 14:15 - 15:45 Besprechungsraum Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O2-07
Dienstag 18.06. 14:15 - 15:45 Besprechungsraum Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O2-07
Freitag 21.06. 16:00 - 20:00 Besprechungsraum Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O2-07
Samstag 22.06. 09:00 - 13:00 Besprechungsraum Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O2-07
Dienstag 25.06. 14:15 - 15:45 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Aims, contents & method

Aims:
1) gain knowledge in academic genre analysis, literacy studies and ELFA research
2) gain familiarity with and experience in working with applied linguistic methods
3) gain detailed empirical insights regarding a (student) academic written genre

Contents & Method:
The internationalisation of higher education has gone hand-in-hand with an unprecedented push for English for its main institutional purposes, i.e. education and research, resulting in English (as a lingua franca) functioning as main language of academic writing world-wide, be it by expert users or by students. Although nobody is a native speaker of academic English – after all, it requires a lot of time and effort to learn to participate in academic practices – the ins and outs of academic writing are certainly more demanding to make one’s own in a second language. The challenges students and academics face when wanting to produce academic texts in English have motivated various applied linguistic and educational research areas, such as English for Academic Purposes (EAP) or literacy studies. This rich literature offers approaches to and insights into crucial questions, such as: What do different academic genres look like? What differences are there within and across different disciplines? What knowledge and abilities do (student) writers draw on when producing appropriate texts? In what ways do such literacy skills develop over time?
It is questions like these that we will deal with in the seminar course, which will focus on academic writing and literacy in the context of English as a lingua franca in academia (ELFA). Based on readings, discussions and textual examples, participants will learn about relevant research areas and approaches (e.g. qualitative corpus-based discourse studies, genre analysis, EAP). By undertaking small-scale empirical studies of self-collected data-sets, they will gain informed insights into (developing) literacy practices, textual sequences and discursive patterns of academic texts in ELFA and what implications these findings might have for the writers’ academic learning and identities.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Course evaluation is based on:
* class participation & assignments (max. 15 points)
* data collection (max. 10 points)
* project proposal (max. 10 points
* oral presentation (max. 15 points)
* seminar paper (max. 50 points)

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria
a) regular class attendance (in person and online) (max. 2 absences)
b) giving the oral presentation (on set date)
c) handing in project description & seminar paper (on time)
d) attaining 60 of the maximum 100 points

Final grades & points achieved: ‘1’: 90-100; ‘2’: 80-89; ‘3’: 70-79; ‘4’: 60-69; ‘5’: 0-59

Prüfungsstoff

Presentation, seminar paper, engagement in discussion and group work, assignments & project proposal

Literatur

Biber, Douglas; Conrad, Susan; Reppen, Randi; Byrd, Pat; Helt, Marie. 2002. Speaking and writing in the university: a multidimensional comparison. TESOL Quarterly 36 (1), 9-48.
Basturkmen, Helen. 2021. Linguistic description in English for academic purposes. New York, NY; Routledge.
Flowerdew, Lynne. 2016. A genre-inspired and lexico-grammatical approach for helping postgraduate students craft research grant proposals. English for Specific Purposes 42, 1–12.
Green, Simon. 2020. Scaffolding academic literacy with low-proficiency users of English. Cham: Springer.
Horner, Bruce. 2018. Written academic English as a lingua franca. In Jennifer Jenkins, Will Baker, Martin Dewey (Eds.): The Routledge handbook of English as a lingua lranca. London; Routledge; pp. 413–426.
Hyland, Ken. 2009. Academic discourse. English in a global context. London: Continuum.
Lillis, Theresa; Tuck, Jackie. 2016. Academic literacies. A critical lens on writing and reading in the academy. In Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw (eds.). The Routledge handbook of English for academic purposes. New York: Routledge, pp. 30–43.
Mauranen, Anna; Hynninen, Niina; Ranta, Elina. 2016. In Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw (eds.): The Routledge handbook of English for academic purposes. New York: Routledge; pp. 44-55.
Moghaddasi, S., Graves, H., Graves, R., & Gutierrez, X. (2019). “See Figure 1”: Visual moves in discrete mathematics research articles. English for Specific Purposes 56: 50-67.
Nesi, Hilary. 2016. Corpus studies in EAP. In Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw (eds.): The Routledge handbook of English for academic purposes. New York, NY: Routledge; pp. 206–217.
Nesi, Hilary; Gardner, Sheena, 2012. Genres across the disciplines. Student writing in higher education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Omidian, Taha; Shahariari, Hesamoddin; Siyanova-Chanturia, Anna. 2018. A cross-disciplinary investigation of multi-word expressions int eh moves of research article abstracts. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 36: 1-14.
Parkinson, Jean. 2017. The student laboratory report genre: A genre analysis. English for Specific Purposes 45: 1–13.
Rounsaville, Angela. 2014. Situating transnational genre knowledge: a genre trajectory analysis of one student’s personal and academic writing. Written Communication 31/3: 332-364.
Shaw, Philip. 2016. Genre analysis. In Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw (eds.). The Routledge handbook of English for academic purposes. New York: Routledge; pp. 243–255.
Yoon, Jungwan; Casal J. Elliott. 2019. Rhetorical structure, sequence, and variation: A step-driven move analysis of applied linguistics conference abstracts. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 30: 462-478.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Studium: MA 812 [2];
Code/Modul: MA 4, MA 5;
Lehrinhalt: 12-0496

Letzte Änderung: Do 02.05.2024 17:45