Universität Wien FIND

123041 PS Literary Studies / Proseminar Literature (2019W)

(Re-)Inventing Australia: Changing National and Transnational Imaginaries in Australian Literature

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 10.10. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 17.10. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 24.10. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 31.10. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 07.11. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 14.11. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 21.11. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 28.11. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 05.12. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 09.01. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 16.01. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 23.01. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17
Donnerstag 30.01. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 5 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-17

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

In his by now classic study Inventing Australia (1981), Richard White has argued that Australia, as any nation, is an ‘invention’ that is neither uniform nor stable. Rather, since, as he continues, ‘national identity is continually being fractured, questioned and redefined’, Australia has meant different things to different people at different times. Taking this insight as our starting point, this Proseminar is designed to engage with the changing imaginaries of Australia present in its literature. We consider how different texts have conceived of the nation differently at different times. In this sense, we take a diachronic approach to examine the role of literature in inventing and constantly re-inventing the nation. To this end, we analyse literary texts that are highly diverse in many respects: in terms of genre (we consider both poetry and prose fiction), time of publication (we discuss texts from the late nineteenth century as well as contemporary ones) and authors (we read texts by Indigenous Australians and settlers, i.e. Anglo-Celtic and ethnic minority writers).

Central issues addressed in this Proseminar will include:
1. How did Australian writing participate in the formation of a distinctively Australian national identity in the late nineteenth century?
2. How does contemporary literature envision the nation and how have dominant narratives changed over time?
3. What versions of Australia do in particular texts by Indigenous and ethnic minority writers present, who have traditionally been excluded from dominant representations of the nation?
4. How do the texts under discussion negotiate concepts such as ethnicity, gender, class and sexuality and what effect does this have on their imagination of Australia?
5. How does contemporary literature respond to the growing significance of global, transnational connections that consciously extend beyond the confines of the nation?

Apart from addressing the primary texts in their form and content, this Proseminar is also designed to introduce you to basic academic skills, including academic writing, thesis formulation and the structuring of a term paper in literary studies.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

• Regular attendance (two sessions may be missed) and preparation of session material
• General participation in class, including individual contributions as well as work in groups
• Expert work on assigned readings: each student will be assigned to one source material of the syllabus and provide expert input in the respective session (experts are expected to provide everyone with a handout summarising the most important points)
• A written portfolio consisting of short writing tasks
• A formal research paper of 3,500 words (+/- 10%): Deadline is 30 January 2020

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

• Active participation and contributions in class (including your expert input in your respective session): 20%
• Written portfolio tasks: 20%
• Term paper: 60%

Points must be collected in all of these categories (at least 50% of the points in all categories). Students must attain at least 60% overall to pass the course.

All written assignments will be checked for plagiarism, using Turnitin on moodle.

Marks in %:
1 (sehr gut): 90-100
2 (gut): 80-89
3 (befriedigend): 70-79
4 (genügend): 60-69
5 (nicht genügend): 0-59

Prüfungsstoff

There will be no written exam.

Literatur

Primary Texts
Jones, Gail. Five Bells. Vintage, 2012. (will be available on moodle)
Lawson, Henry. “The City Bushman.” The Ballad of the Drover and Other Verses, Angus & Robertson, 1988, pp. 226-229. (will be available on moodle)
---. “Up the Country.” The Ballad of the Drover and Other Verses, Angus & Robertson, 1988, pp. 207-208. (will be available on moodle)
Paterson, A.B. ‘Banjo’. “Clancy of the Overflow.” A.B. ‘Banjo’ Paterson: Bush Ballads, Poems, Stories and Journalism, edited by Clement Semmler, U of Queensland P, 1992, pp. 5-6. (will be available on moodle)
Paterson, Banjo. “In Defence of the Bush.” Complete Poems, Angus & Robertson, 2014, pp. 80-81. (will be available on moodle)
Scott, Kim. Taboo. Picador, 2017. (We will discuss the full novel, so please buy this edition. It will be available at Facultas am Campus.)
Tsiolkas, Christos. The Slap. Tuskar Rock P, 2010. (We will discuss the full novel, so please buy this edition. It will be available at Facultas am Campus.)

Students are asked to start reading the three novels as soon as possible.

Theory and Secondary Literature
Carter, David. “Bush Legends and Pastoral Landscapes.” Teaching Australian and New Zealand Literature, edited by Nicholas Birns et al., The Modern Language Association of America, 2017, pp. 42-54.
Dunlop, Nicholas. “Suburban Space and Multicultural Identities in Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap.” Antipodes, vol. 30, no. 1, 2016, pp. 5-16.
Gleeson-White, Jane. “Properly Alive: Taboo by Kim Scott.” Sydney Review of Books, 22 August 2017, https://sydneyreviewofbooks.com/taboo-kim-scott-review/.
Kušnír, Jaroslav. “Diasporic ‘Home’ and Transnational Identities in Gail Jones’s Five Bells.” Diasporic Constructions of Home and Belonging, edited by Florian Kläger and Klaus Stierstorfer, De Gruyter, 2015, pp. 465-477.
Midalia, Susan. “The Idea of Place: Reading for Pleasure and the Workings of Power.” English in Australia, vol. 47, no. 3, 2012, pp. 44-51.
Rodoreda, Geoff. The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction. Peter Lang, 2018.
Treagus, Mandy. “Queering the Mainstream: The Slap and ‘Middle’ Australia.” JASAL, vol. 12, no. 3, 2012, pp. 1-9.
White, Richard. “Inventing Australia Revisited.” Creating Australia: Changing Australian History, edited by Wayne Hudson and Geoffrey Bolton, Allen & Unwin, 1997, pp. 12-22.

These texts, relevant excerpts from them or links to them will be available on moodle at the beginning of term.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Studium: UF 344, BA 612; BEd 046 / 407
Code/Modul: UF 3.3.3-304, BA10.1; BEd 08a.1, BEd 08b.2
Lehrinhalt: 12-3041

Letzte Änderung: Do 26.09.2019 11:48