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123043 PS Literary Studies / Proseminar Literature (2020S)

Early Modern Literary Utopias

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first serve").

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 05.03. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 19.03. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 26.03. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 02.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 23.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 30.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 07.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 14.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 28.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 04.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 18.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 25.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Although not an invention of early modern literature, the genre of the utopia gained increased political relevance after Christopher Columbus’ and Amerigo Vespucci’s transatlantic voyages. The beginning of what is now euphemistically referred to as the ‘Age of Discovery’ paradoxically marks both, the utopia’s re-invention as a literary genre and the point at which labelling it as ‘fiction’ seems wholly inadequate. The irony of history is that the naming of the genre, in Thomas More’s Utopia (1516/1551), puns at good-place (eu-topos) and no-place (ou-topos) but coincides with the onset of its geographically very specific and dystopian consequences. More’s complex narrative will be the starting point of our brief survey of utopias. We will be looking at how authors after More, such as Francis Bacon, and Margaret Cavendish, utilised the concept of the utopia and its contingent early modern tropes. Furthermore, we will be referring to utopian texts from Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and to modern-day theory of the utopia and its cognate forms.

This course will familiarise students with key techniques of academic research and text production. Participants will learn to critically analyse literary works while considering historical contexts and using appropriate theoretical concepts. This course builds on the contents of the literary and cultural theory introductory lectures and focuses on ‘doing’ theory. We will recapitulate the most relevant theoretical concepts from narratology, general literary theory, and rhetoric. During this course, students will plan a research project resulting in a short final paper.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

attendance (also for video conferencing) / preparation of assigned reading materials / active participation online (Moodle and video conferencing) / specialist session (incl. handout and prep talk in week prior to the session) / submitting an abstract for the final paper / submitting a final paper / students must own and use hard copies of the assigned reading material (books + reader, see below)

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Weighting of tasks as follows; Points must be collected in all of these categories:
15 % Participation online (Glossary; Moodle; video conferencing)
20 % Specialist session
5 % Handout for specialist session
10 % Abstract (300 words)
50 % Final paper (3500 words)

Marking as follows:
90-100 % 1 (very good)
80-89 % 2 (good)
70-79 % 3 (satisfactory)
60-69 % 4 (pass)
0-59 % 5 (fail)

Handout, abstract, and final paper must adhere to the department style sheet. The final paper, accompanied by an anti-plagiarism statement, must be handed in via email and as a PDF-file.

No more than two lessons may be missed without medical statement. Missing more than three lessons will result in failing the class.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

Bacon, Francis. New Atlantis (1626)
Cavendish, Margaret. Blazing World (1666)
More, Thomas. Utopia (Lat.1516/ Engl.1551)

Students are encouraged to acquire and consult a copy of An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature by Vera and Ansgar Nünning (alternatively, copies are available at the department library as well as the main library).

Additional material will be uploaded on Moodle during the semester.

The READER will be available from Facultas am Campus, where the following editions of our primary works have been ordered for you:

• Cavendish, Margaret. A Description of the Blazing World. Ed. Lilly. (Penguin Classics). ISBN 9780140433722

Three Early Modern Utopias. Thomas More: Utopia / Francis Bacon: New Atlantis / Henry Neville: The Isle of Pines. Ed. Bruce (Oxford World's Classics). ISBN 9780199537990

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Studium: UF 344, BA 612; BEd 046 / 407
Code/Modul: UF 3.3.3-304; BA10.1; BEd 08a.1, BEd 08b.2
Lehrinhalt: 12-3041

Letzte Änderung: Mo 07.09.2020 15:20