Universität Wien FIND
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123224 SE Literature Seminar / BA Paper / MA British/Irish/New English (2016W)

Contemporary Irish Short Stories

11.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Details

max. 20 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Donnerstag 06.10. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 13.10. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 20.10. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 27.10. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 03.11. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 10.11. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 17.11. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 24.11. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 01.12. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 15.12. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 12.01. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 19.01. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Donnerstag 26.01. 10:00 - 12:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Ireland has a rich literary tradition in all genres. One of the less frequently discussed, yet unjustly neglected genres is that of short fiction. Often considered the novel’s ‘poor cousin’, the short story, in fact, is an immensely rewarding, often self-reflexive, form that likes to challenge its reader. In this course we are going to discuss short story poetics as well as the Irish tradition of short fiction in the 20th and 21st centuries and aim building bridges between literary texts and concepts taken from cultural theory. Although James Joyce isn’t exactly a ‘contemporary’ writer, it would be absurd to discuss Irish short fiction without taking a look at Dubliners (1914). One of its stories is going to provide the basis for a narratological analysis - which will help us sharpen our tools at the beginning of term. Although Freud famously maintained that the Irish, in his opinion, were impervious to psychoanalysis, we are going to discuss a Lacanian approach to another of the stories collected in Dubliners. If Joyce can be considered the ‘father’ of the 20th century Irish short story, Elizabeth Bowen is probably the best candidate for ‘mother’ of this narrative tradition, whose perspective on class and gender at the mid-20th century will be valuable to explore, before zeroing in on short stories published by writers between the 1940s and the early noughties. Themes of focus will be choice, submission, entrapment, empowerment, violence, love, betrayal, politics, imagination, abuse and the uncanny, and we’ll try to assess how the stories centred on these contribute to, or evoke and cross out, or provide alternatives to traditional narratives of Irishness and the Irish.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur

Book to buy:

• Anne Enright (ed.), The Granta Book of the Irish Short Story, (London, 2001) [ISBN: 978-1847082558]

Will be made available as pdf:

• James Joyce, ‘Eveline’ and ‘The Sisters’ from Dubliners

• Elizabeth Bowen, ‘A Walk in the Woods’ and ‘Sunday Afternoon’

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Studium: UF 344, BA 612, MA 844;
Code/Modul: UF 4.2.4-322, BA10.2, MA4,
Lehrinhalt: 12-0374

Letzte Änderung: Fr 31.08.2018 08:50