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130105 PS Literar. Wechselbeziehungen (PS): An Introduction to the Romantic Movement Part II: (2017S)

The Romantic Legacy

Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 30 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Important note to all prospective students

Although the title may well suggest otherwise, completion of 'An Introduction to the Romantic Movement Part I: The Romantic Hero' is not a pre-requisite for this course. The main themes from Part I will be covered during the conspectus lectures of Part II.

This particular Seminar will begin at 18:30 (or soon thereafter, depending on the time at which the room is vacated) and will extend until at least 20:30, very likely 20:45, and, occasionally, 21:00. An individual presentation will not be required of students in this Seminar; however, be advised that the course has been specifically designed as an evening class in order to provide sufficient flexibility for discussion and debate, so please do not anticipate leaving prior to half-past eight. There are two scheduled optional film presentations on the evenings of Friday, March 24th and Friday, May 5th; although attendance is not obligatory for those who have prior commitments, the presented material is relevant contextually and will be discussed and referenced under the broader canopy of the course. The works listed below comprise the ‘tentative’ schedule, which will alter in content pursuant to student interest and discussion (i.e., not all of the works will be required reading); however, any and all textual material contained in this initial listing may be used as a basis for the term paper and essay composition on the final exam.

Mittwoch 08.03. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 15.03. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 22.03. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 29.03. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 05.04. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Freitag 07.04. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 8 Sensengasse 3a 5.OG
Mittwoch 26.04. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 03.05. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Freitag 05.05. 18:30 - 21:30 Seminarraum 8 Sensengasse 3a 5.OG
Mittwoch 10.05. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 17.05. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 24.05. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 31.05. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 07.06. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Freitag 09.06. 18:00 - 21:00 Seminarraum 8 Sensengasse 3a 5.OG
Mittwoch 14.06. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 21.06. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Freitag 23.06. 18:30 - 21:30 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Mittwoch 28.06. 18:30 - 21:00 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

An Introduction to Romanticism (1826 to 2016)
Part II: The Romantic Legacy

Aims, contents and method of the course

The objective of this course is to provide a continuing introduction to Romanticism in its original context in complement to the literary and artistic movements to which it gave rise throughout the nineteenth century. Our primary focus rests on the incipient decline of the Romantic Hero and the swift, subsequent descent into the darker reaches of the human psyche. In this reorienting world of decadence, æstheticism and social realism the nascent thrust of the Romantic imagination violently yields to its fragility. The deepening of Gothic themes is paramount to our study. Reading material will reflect the manner in which earlier emphasis on the individual and sublimity resituates in the authors’ confrontation of their inward emotional responses to fear, awe, apprehension, horror and terror. And yet with individualism and emotion as the source through which æsthetic experience could be perceived, entered into and felt, in the selected poems, novellas and novels under discussion in this course students will compass the means by which the later Romantics and their descendants sought to unravel the mysteries of the internal and external worlds in which they resided and why they felt continually compelled to re-evaluate their place within those decidedly ‘modern’ worlds.

The method of instruction is based on traditional lecture complemented by open class discussion. As the lectures are a combination of visual presentation material and oral supplement, it is worth stating from the outset that regular attendance is absolutely essential to a proper understanding of this course: missing a single session will invariably pose problems in reception of the overall context. The nature of ‘open discussion’ requires both commitment and patience: those who enrol are strongly advised to clear their Wednesday evening schedules without complaint as classes will not close before half-past eight and, on occasion (and perhaps even frequently), may extend until nine. Given the restrictions of time and the depth of the material, a listed work may be reduced to a cursory reading and will not be discussed at any length by the instructor; nonetheless, as discussion and debate are expected and indeed required in this course, students are encouraged to open and advance dialogue on any subject pertaining to the original syllabus.

This particular Seminar will begin at 18:30 (or soon thereafter, depending on the time at which the room is vacated) and will extend until at least 20:30, very likely 20:45, and, occasionally, 21:00. An individual presentation will not be required of students in this Seminar; however, be advised that the course has been specifically designed as an evening class in order to provide sufficient flexibility for discussion and debate, so please do not anticipate leaving prior to half-past eight. There are two scheduled optional film presentations on the evenings of Friday, March 24th and Friday, May 5th; although attendance is not obligatory for those who have prior commitments, the presented material is relevant contextually and will be discussed and referenced under the broader canopy of the course. The works listed below comprise the ‘tentative’ schedule, which will alter in content pursuant to student interest and discussion (i.e., not all of the works will be required reading); however, any and all textual material contained in this initial listing may be used as a basis for the term paper and essay composition on the final exam.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Assessment and permitted materials

Students are assessed on their written submissions. There will be five quizzes based on the reading material and presentations; the highest four grades will comprise the final grade for that component. There will not be a formal oral component to this course; in lieu of the seminar presentation, each student will complete either a direct reading response or a research assignment. There will also be a formal term essay of between 1500 and 2250 words; subject matter will be broadly-based and should enable students to develop a topic based on their own interest in the course material. The course will close with a comprehensive final exam.

There is no coursebook. However, students should attempt to procure copies of material that may not be available electronically. Preparatory material for each lecture—including the relevant ‘excerpts from’ selections—will be sent to students by email on the Thursday prior to Wednesday’s seminar; should PDF files be available online, a suitable link will be provided. Discussion will take place in English based on the translated versions of non-English readings; however, as the instructor has at least a reading familiarity with French, Italian and German, students are kindly reminded of the comparative nature of this course and strongly advised to pursue the works in their language of composition; all written submissions may also include quoted passages from the original texts.

In the interests of fairness and courtesy, students are not permitted to use laptops or tablets during the lecture and mobile phones must be switched off prior to each class.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Regular attendance is essential to understanding the thematic thread of this course; please attempt to inform the instructor of any classes that are likely to be missed in advance. Missed quizzes may not be written at a later date. Late submissions will be accepted only with prior approval of the instructor.

The final grade for this course comprises the following parts:

•Five fifteen-minute quizzes (part multiple choice; part short answer): 10%
•Research assignment (750-1250 words): 20%
•Essay (1500-2250 words): 30%
•Final exam: 40%

Prüfungsstoff

Examination topics

The final examination draws upon the quizzes and previous written submissions. There should be no surprises and students will be prepared for the format well in advance. The exam comprises twenty multiple choice questions (20%), seven short answer responses (30%) and one essay of between 750 and 1500 words (50%); the four essay topics will draw upon readings from the syllabus.

Literatur

Tentative Summer Term Schedule

March 8th, 2017
Conspectus: The Romantic Hero and the Gothic Exterior
Matthew Gregory Lewis
With The Death of the Monk excerpt from The Monk; A Romance (1796)
George Gordon, Lord Byron
With the Seeking Things beyond Mortality excerpt from Manfred (1817)

March 15th, 2017
Conspectus: Mémoires d’Outre-Tombe
E. T. A. Hoffmann
With excerpts from The Devil’s Elixir [Die Elixiere des Teufels] (1815)
François-René de Chateaubriand
With reference to Memoirs from Beyond the Grave (1849 & 1850)

March 22nd, 2017
Conspectus: The Shadowed Soul
Adelbert von Chamisso
The Shadowless Man [Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte] (1814)

*Friday, March 24th, 2017
Friday Evening Film Presentation: The Shadow in the Attic
Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre (1847)

March 29th, 2017
Wanderlust and the Tortured Soul
Joseph, Freiherr von Eichendorff
With reference to Memoirs of a Ne’er-do-well [Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts] (1826)
Mikhail Lermontov
The Demon (1842)

April 5th, 2017
*Research Assignment Due
Demonomania, the Superfluous Man and Oblomovism
Vladimir Odoyevsky
The Sylphide (From the Notes of a Rational Man) (1837)
Ivan Turgenev
With reference to The Diary of a Superfluous Man (1850)
First Love (1860)
Ivan Goncharov
With reference to “Oblomov’s Dream” from Oblomov (1859)

[April 12th & April 19th, 2017: Easter Holidays, no classes scheduled]

April 26th, 2017
The Poet’s Solitude
Alfred de Vigny
With excerpts from Stello and Chatterton (1832)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
With an excerpt from Maud (1855)
Robert Browning
“Andrea del Sarto” (Called ‘The Faultless Painter’) (1855)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
With excerpts from Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850)
With excerpts from Aurora Leigh (1856)

May 3rd, 2017
The Erotic Decadent
Charles Baudelaire
With the The Vampire and Lethe excerpts from Les Fleurs du mal (1857)
Christina Rossetti
With readings from Goblin Market and Other Poems (1862)
Algernon Charles Swinburne
The Leper (1866)

*Friday, May 5th, 2017
Friday Evening Film Presentation: Between the Shadow and the Grave
Bram Stoker Dracula (1897)

May 10th, 2017
The Aesthetic Decadent
Joris-Karl Huysmans
À rebours [Against Nature] (1884)

May 17th, 2017
‘Romantic’ Realism
Theodor Storm
The Rider on the White Horse [Der Schimmelreiter] (1888)

May 24th, 2017
Naturalism and Symbolism
Guy de Maupassant
Le Horla (1887)
Zinaida Gippius
“The Apple Trees Blossom” (1893)

May 31st, 2017
Victorian Gothic
Robert Louis Stevenson
With reference to The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886)
Oscar Wilde
The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890)

June 7th, 2017
Post-Romantic Isolation and the Death of the Individual in Contemporary Media
The Prisoner (Television Series 1967-1968)
Dexter (Television Series 2006-2013)
Person of Interest (Television Series 2011-2016)

June 14th, 2017
Course Review

June 21st, 2017
Final Exam
Multiple Choice 20%
Short Answer 30%
Essay 50%

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

BA M4

Letzte Änderung: Mo 07.09.2020 15:34