Universität Wien FIND
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140015 VO Race, Gender and Sexuality in African Literature (2017W)

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Details

Sprache: Englisch

Prüfungstermine

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Dienstag 10.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 17.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 24.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 31.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 07.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 14.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 21.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 28.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 05.12. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 12.12. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 09.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 16.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Dienstag 23.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Aims (Ziele):
• Identify and analyse the operations of race and gender categories in African nationalist discourses as reflected in Anglophone African literature from Nigeria, Kenya, Zimbabwe and South Africa
• analyse key African literary works in terms of their social and historical context
• apply close reading skills and critical thinking to a variety of literary texts
• reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts

Content (Inhalt): This course will explore the many ways in which “race” and “gender” have come into being through each other and governed political identities and relationships in (post)colonial Africa, as reflected in African Anglophone and British imperial writing of the last two centuries. “Race” and “gender” will be seen as interchangeable terms in the patriarchal enterprise of colonialism and the resistance against it, and as over-loaded concepts that continue to impact upon the understanding of what it means to be “African”. Topics to be discussed include the gendered imagination of imperial adventure novels; the marginalization of femininity by both colonial and African nationalist discourses; feminist rewritings of African nationalism; the sexualized perception of mixed-raced identities; the pathologization of gay sexuality across Africa; the sexualization and commodification of the African female body in Europe; sexual violence against women legitimized by tradition and nationalism, and others. Dissident desire will be explored as both a destructive force and a boundary-breaking energy that can redefine both the body and the nation through an imaginary encounter with otherness, leading to creolisation and hybridity. The course will engage with postcolonial, feminist, queer and other literary theories, as well as notions from the history and criticism of African literature in English.

Methods: Lecture and discussion

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Exam or argumentative essay
Exam will contain YES/NO, multiple choice and open questions
Essay should be 3500-4000 words. Topics will be given to choose from.
4 dates will be fixed for exam or essay submission

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

The mark breakdown is as follows:

Excellent (1) 90-100 %
Good (2) 80-89 %
Satisfactory enough (3) 65-79 %
Unsatisfactory (4) 50-64 %
Fail ( 5) 49 -0 %

Assessment criteria for written work:

-Conditions (timely delivery, correct extent, presentable shape, presence of all components of a written work): Here no points can be awarded, but might be deducted!

-Contents (in particular the soundness of the argument, supported with evidence from primary and secondary sources; the ability to read text closely and interpret both form and content; the ability to identify, analyse and understand the context and make connections; the ability to reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts, instead of just citing secondary texts as a source of authority and interpretation; clear formulation, structure and organization of the argument; detection of the central points; correctness of methodology; originality; creativity; scope or relevance of the secondary literature used and their methodologically consistent incorporation): Here about 60% of the points will be awarded.

-Format (esp. layout and clarity of presentation; formatting; citation practice; consistency and care): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

-Language (particularly scholarly terminology and correct use of technical terms; clear and understandable language; correct spelling, grammar, and composition; care about style): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

In all three areas at least 50% of the points must be achieved in order to obtain credit.

Prüfungsstoff

gendered imagination of imperial adventure novels; marginalization of femininity by both colonial and African nationalist discourses; feminist rewritings of African nationalism; dissident desire across race; sexualized perception of mixed-raced identities; African sexuality and marriage traditions in colonial context; double colonization of African women; the pathologization of gay sexuality across Africa; sexualization and commodification of the African female body by Europeans; sexual violence against women legitimized by tradition and nationalism

Literatur

Primary literature:
H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon’s Mines (1885)
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1889)
Sarah Gertrude Millin, God’s Step-Children (1924)
William Plomer, Turbott Wolfe (1925)
Doris Lessing, The Grass is Singing (1950)
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (1958)
Flora Nwapa, Efuru (1966)
Buchi Emecheta, The Joys of Motherhood (1979)
Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1988)
Wilson Katiyo, A Son of the Soil (1976)
Yvonne Vera, Without a Name (1994)
J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1998)
K. Sello Duiker, The Quiet Violence of Dreams (2001)
Chika Unigwe, On Black Sisters’ Street (2009)
Lewis Nkosi, Mating Birds (1986)
Chinelo Okparanta, Under the Udala Trees (2015)

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

ÜAL1, ÜAL2, EC-148;

Letzte Änderung: Mo 18.09.2017 12:29