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143121 VO Topics in African Literature (Anglophone and Afrophone) (2021W)

DIGITAL
Mo 06.12. 13:00-14:30 Digital

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Montag 04.10. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 11.10. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 18.10. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 25.10. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 08.11. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 15.11. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 22.11. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 29.11. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 13.12. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 10.01. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 17.01. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 24.01. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital
Montag 31.01. 13:00 - 14:30 Digital

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

CONTENT: This introductory lecture series will trace the birth and development of modern African literature, mainly in English, but also in Gikuyu, Xhosa, Yoruba, Sesotho, Acholi, and pidjin, exploring a wide range of socio-historical, aesthetic and philosophical issues and trends from early 20th century to the present. The socio-historical topics include for example re-writing colonial histories, anti-colonial nationalism, post-independence disillusionment and decolonization, the impact of neo-colonization and globalization on Africa, the criticism of African literature, the process of canonization, and the material aspects of publishing. The aesthetic topics concern for example style and genre, language choice, appropriation vs. abrogation, social realism versus modernism, and the influence of African orality and Western forms on the African novel. The philosophical topics to be explored include the role of the African writer and the function of literature in Africa, the construction of ethnic identities in literature, the clash between tradition and modernity, writing back to the centre, postcolonial hybridity, the representation of women by male authors, feminist discourses, the position of African literature in world literature, the questions of authenticity and audience, and the universal versus local. Framing the discussion will be the questions of the politics of identity and ownership of African literature and how African literature is related to and communicates with other literatures in the world.
METHOD: Lecture
AIMS: • Identify, analyse and understand key socio-historical, aesthetic and philosophical issues in African literature
• apply theory to a variety of literary texts and reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts
• discriminate between ideas and define personal positions and justify them intellectually
• produce well-structured, relevant arguments with an appropriate intellectual framework

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Written exam (3 mini essays, 90 minutes) OR Argumentative essay (3500 words, written at home).
In case of a new wave of Covid-19 pandemic, the exam will be taken online.
Permitted aids: any

The final essay should analyze at least one work (novel, play, or at least 2 short stories). You will be given a list of app. 20 essay topics to choose from. The final essay is not just a summary of what was said in the lecture. It should show your own approach to a primary work and bring original observations and/or opinions.

There will be 1 date for written exam and 3 dates for essay submission.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

The exam will include short essay questions. You have to choose 3. Each should be a minimum 250 words long.

The final essay should analyze at least one work (novel, play, or at least 3 short stories). You will be given a list of app. 20 essay topics to choose from. The final essay is not just a summary of what was said in the lecture. It should show your own approach to a primary work and bring original observations and/or opinions.

The written exam will take place on the last date of the course only.
All exam dates are available for essay submission.
Permitted aids: any

Detailed evaluation criteria:

1) Content (in particular detection of the central points; clear formulation, structure and organization of the argument, supported with evidence from primary and secondary sources; the ability to read text closely and interpret both form and content; the ability to identify, analyse and understand the context and make connections; the ability to reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts, instead of just citing secondary texts as a source of authority and interpretation; correctness of methodology; originality; creativity; scope or relevance of the secondary literature used and their methodologically consistent incorporation): Here about 60% of the points will be awarded.

2) Format (esp. layout, formatting, and citation practice): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

3) Language (particularly scholarly terminology and correct use of technical terms; clear and understandable language; correct spelling, grammar, and sentence composition; care about style): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

In all three areas at least 50% of the points must be achieved in order to obtain credit. The mark breakdown is as follows:

Excellent (1) 90-100 %
Good (2) 80-89 %
Satisfactory enough (3) 65-79 %
Unsatisfactory (4) 50-64 %
Fail (5) 49 -0 %

Prüfungsstoff

The socio-historical topics include for example re-writing colonial histories, anti-colonial nationalism, post-independence disillusionment and decolonization, the impact of neo-colonization and globalization on Africa, the criticism of African literature, the process of canonization, and the material aspects of publishing. The aesthetic topics concern for example style and genre, language choice, appropriation vs. abrogation, social realism versus modernism, and the influence of African orality and Western forms on the African novel. The philosophical topics to be explored include the role of the African writer and the function of literature in Africa, the construction of ethnic identities in literature, the clash between tradition and modernity, writing back to the centre, postcolonial hybridity, the representation of women by male authors, feminist discourses, the position of African literature in world literature, the questions of authenticity and audience, and the universal versus local. Framing the discussion will be the questions of the politics of identity and ownership of African literature and how African literature is related to and communicates with other literatures in the world.

Literatur

This is not the reading list. It is only the content of the lectures. You can choose what you want to read.

PRIMARY LITERATURE:
Thomas Mofolo, Moeti oa bochabela (The Traveler to the East, 1907), Chaka (1925)
R. R. R. Dhlomo, An African Tragedy (1928)
Solomon Plaatje, Mhudi (1930)
A.C. Jordan, Ingqumbo Yezinyanya (The Wrath of Ancestors, 1940)
Jomo Kenyatta, Facing Mount Kenya (1938)
D. O. Fagunwa, Ògbójú Ọdẹ nínú Igbó Irúnmalẹ̀ (The Forest of A Thousand Demons, 1938)
Okot p’Bitek, Wer pa Lawino (Song of Lawino, 1949, 1969)
Amos Tutola, The Palm-Wine Drinkard (1952)
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (1958) and “Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness”
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, The River Between (1965) and “Karen Blixen’s Dog”
Chinua Achebe, “The Truth of Fiction”, “Novelist as Teacher”, “The Writer and his Community”, Girls at War and Other Stories (1952)
Wole Soyinka, The Interpreters (1965)
Muthoni Likimani, They Shall Be Chastised (1974)
Cyprian Ekwensi, Jagua Nana (1961)
Flora Nwapa, Efuru (1966) and “Women and Creative Writing in Africa” (1995)
Grace Ogot, The Promised Land (1966)
Buchi Emecheta, Joys of Motherhood (1979) and “Feminism with a small f”
Ama Ata Aidoo, No Sweetness Here (1971)
Charity Waciuma, Daughter of Mumbi (1969)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Weep Not, Child (1964)
Wilson Katiyo, A Son of the Soil (1976)
Peter Abrahams, Tell Freedom (1954)
Chinua Achebe, “The African Writer and the English Language” (1965) from Morning Yet… (1975)
Chinua Achebe, “Politics and Politicians of Language in African Literature”, from Education of a British-Protected Child (2009)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, “The Language in African Literature” from Decolonising the Mind (1986)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Taban Lo Liyong, “On the Abolition of the English Department” (1968)
Aye Kwei Armah, The Beautyful Ones are Not Yet Born (1968) and “Masks and Marx” (1985)
Chinua Achebe, No Longer at Ease (1960) and A Man of the People (1966)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Caitaani Mutharaba-Ini (Devil on the Cross, 1980)
Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Writing against Neo-colonialism (1986) and “Writers in Politics” (1997)
Ben Okri, “When Lights Return” from Stars of the New Curfew (1988) and The Famished Road (1991)
Ken Saro-Wiwa, Sozaboy: A Novel in Rotten English (1985)
Ama Ata Aidoo, No Sweetness Here (1971)
Yvonne Vera, Without a Name (1994)
Binyawanga Wainaina, “How to Write About Africa” (2005)
NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names (2013)
Helon Habila, review of NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names (2013)
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/jun/20/need-new-names-bulawayo-review
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “African ‘authenticity’ and the Biafran experience” (2008)
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “The Danger of a Single Story” (2009), Americanah (2013), “You in America” and “New Husband” (2003)
Chika Unigwe, On Black Sisters’ Street (2009) and “The Secret” (2007)
Brian Chikwava, Harare North (2009)
E. C. Osondu, “Waiting” (2009)
Imbolo Mbue, Behold the Dreamers (2016)
Taiye Selasi, “Bye-Bye Babar” (2005)
Emma Dabiri, “Why I am (still) not an Afropolitan” (2016)
Helon Habila, “The Immigrant” (2009)
Sefi Atta, A Bit of Difference (2013) and “News from Home” (2009)
Doreen Baingana, “Lost in Los Angeles” from Tropical Fish (2005)
Teju Cole, Open City (2011)
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun (2006)
Maaza Mengiste, Beneath the Lion’s Gaze (2010)
Nadifa Mohamed, The Orchard of Lost Souls (2013)
Laila Lalami, The Moor’s Account (2014)
Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing (2016)
Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi, Kintu (2017)
Namwali Serpell, The Old Drift (2019)

SECONDARY LITERATURE:
Olaniyan, Tejumola and Ato Quayson, eds., African Literature: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory (Blackwell, 2007)
Gikandi, Simon and Abiola Irele, eds. The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature (2004)
Ngugi, Mukoma. The Rise of the African Novel: Politics of Language, Identity, and Ownership. 2018.
Ogunyemi, Chikwenye Okonjo. African Wo/Man Palava: The Nigerian Novel by Women. 1996.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

ÜAL1/1, ÜAL1/2, ÜAL2/1, ÜAL2/2, SAL/A, SAL/B, EC-148, EC-647, MA: SAL.VO.1, SAL.VO.2

Letzte Änderung: So 05.12.2021 15:28