Universität Wien
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143121 VO 20th century African Women's Writing and Feminism (2022W)

VOR-ORT

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

Sprache: Englisch

Prüfungstermine

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

This course will be held in presence only (situation permitting)

  • Montag 03.10. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 10.10. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 17.10. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 24.10. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 31.10. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 14.11. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 21.11. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 28.11. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 05.12. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 12.12. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 09.01. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 16.01. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
  • Montag 23.01. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

CONTENT: African women’s rights were considered a secondary issue to African anti-colonial emancipation struggles. Embracing aspects of Western modernity, African men prevented women from doing the same. African male writers’ rewriting of the history written by the colonizer privileged male achievement and symbolically displaced women from the nation. Since the 1960s when African women started writing, they reacted to these false dichotomies with their own rewriting of the colonial encounter, anti-colonial struggles and independence, and the postcolonial nation-building, problematizing the meaning of independence, the nation, tradition, and rethinking the larger question of the meaning of African modernity. Focusing on the private lives of women, they re-imagined gender roles in societies in transition, emphasizing that the private is political. At the same time, they were negotiating their own place in the global feminist movement and assessing the usefulness of Western feminist ideas for their own needs. This course will focus on Anglophone fiction works, which were the primary expressions of feminism by the first- and second-generation African women writers, emphasizing the relationships between the political, aesthetic, socio-historical and material context of these literary texts. These texts shows that their struggles as women and writers reflected those of European women several centuries earlier.
METHOD: Lecture and discussion
AIMS: On completion of this course the student will have developed the ability to:
• identify, analyse and understand key political, philosophical and aesthetic issues in 20th-century African women’s writing
• understand the development of African discussions on women’s rights and African modernity
• apply close reading skills to a variety of literary texts and be able to analyze them from a literary-critical perspective
• reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

OPTION 1: Written exam in class (3 mini essays, 90 minutes). To prepare for the exam, attend the lectures and study the ppt lecture slides. There will be 2 dates for the exam.

OPTION 2: Argumentative paper (3500 words, written at home). You will be given a list of app. 20 topics to choose from. For each topic, recommended texts will be provided. There will be 4 dates for paper submission.

The final paper should analyze at least one work (novel, play, or at least 2 short stories). The final paper is not just a summary of what was said in the lecture. It should show your own approach to a primary work and bring original observations and/or opinions. The purpose of this examination is that you learn to develop an argumentative essay supported with evidence from the text. The final paper tests your close reading skills, inference (deduction), ability to think critically, make connections, and express your opinions. You are not required to do independent research for this paper. Use the secondary texts provided by me.

There will be 2 dates for written exam and 4 dates for paper submission: at the end of the course, at the beginning, in the middle and at the end of next semester.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Minimum requirements: submission of written work (see below) evaluated with at least 50 points
Attendance is not mandatory, but recommended

ASSESSMENT:
OPTION 1
WRITTEN EXAM (90 minutes, written in class or digital, depending on pandemic situation)
Permitted aids: dictionary
The exam will include short essay questions. You have to choose 3. Each should be a minimum 250 words long.

OPTION 2: FINAL PAPER, written at home, app. 3500 words

The final paper should analyze at least one work (novel, play, or at least 2 short stories). You will be given a list of app. 20 topics to choose from. The final paper is not just a summary of what was said in the lecture. It should show your own approach to a primary work and bring original observations and/or opinions.

Detailed evaluation criteria for final paper:

1) Content (in particular detection of the central points; clear formulation, structure and organization of the argument, supported with evidence from primary and secondary sources; the ability to read text closely and interpret both form and content; the ability to identify, analyse and understand the context and make connections; the ability to reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts, instead of just citing secondary texts as a source of authority and interpretation; correctness of methodology; originality; creativity; scope or relevance of the secondary literature used and their methodologically consistent incorporation): Here about 60% of the points will be awarded.

2) Format (esp. layout, formatting, and citation practice): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

3) Language (particularly scholarly terminology and correct use of technical terms; clear and understandable language; correct spelling, grammar, and sentence composition; care about style): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

In all three areas at least 50% of the points must be achieved in order to obtain credit. The mark breakdown is as follows:

Excellent (1) 90-100 %
Good (2) 80-89 %
Satisfactory enough (3) 65-79 %
Unsatisfactory (4) 50-64 %
Fail (5) 49 -0 %

Prüfungsstoff

African women writing back to the male African novel
African women writing back to colonial and anti-colonial discourses
African women's writing and orality
Female genital mutilation in Kenyan women’s writing
The tragedy and the gothic story in African women's writing
The double colonization of African women
The female Bildungsroman in African literature
Queer perspectives in African women's writing
African women and Western feminism
African responses to Western feminism

Literatur

This is not the reading list. It is only the content of the lectures. You can choose what you want to read. Most of the texts will be available on Moodle.

PRIMARY LITERATURE:
Flora Nwapa, Efuru (1966)
Grace Ogot, The Promised Land (1966)
Charity Waciuma, Daughter of Mumbi (1969)
Muthoni Likimani, They Shall Be Chastised (1974)
Buchi Emecheta, Second-Class Citizen (1974), The Bride Price (1976), The Joys of Motherhood (1979)
Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1988)
Yvonne Vera, Butterfly Burning (1998), Without a Name (1996)
Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy (1977), Changes (1991)
Miriam Tlali, Muriel at Metropolitan (1975)
Lauretta Ngcobo, The Cross of Gold (19814), And They Didn’t Die (1990)
Rebeka Njau, The Scar (1961), Ripples in the Pool (1978)
Efua Sutherland, The Marriage of Anansewa (1975)
Ama Ata Aidoo, Anowa (1970)

ESSAYS AND THEORY
Catherine Acholonu, Motherism: The Afrocentric Alternative to Feminism (1995)
Ama Ata Aidoo, “To Be an African Woman Writer” (1988)
Ama Ata Aidoo, “The African Woman Today”, Dissent, Summer 1992, 319-325
Ama Ata Aidoo, “Unwelcome Pals and Decorative Slaves” (1981)
Susan Arndt, “Who is Afraid of Feminism? Critical Perspectives on Feminism in Africa and African Feminism” (2000)
Flora Nwapa, “Women and Creative Writing in Africa” (1992) in Tejumola Olaniyan and Ato Quayson, eds., African Literature: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory (2007)
Buchi Emecheta, “Feminism with a small f” (1988)
Molara Ogundipe-Leslie, Re-Creating Ourselves: African Women and Critical Transformations (1994)
Lauretta Ngcobo, “African Motherhood: Myth and Reality” (1988)
Mary Kolawole, Womanism and African Consciousness (1997)
Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi, “Womanism: The Dynamics of the Contemporary Black Female Novel in English”, Signs, 11.1 (1985), 63-80.
Obioma Nnaemeka, “Nego‐Feminism: Theorizing, Practicing, and Pruning Africa’s Way,” Signs 29.2 (2004), 357-385
Yvonne Vera, “Writing Near the Bone” (1997)

SECONDARY LITERATURE
Susan Andrade, The Nation Writ Small: African Fictions and Feminism, 1958-1988 (2011)
Susan Andrade, “Rewriting History, Motherhood, and Rebellion: Naming an African Women's Literary Tradition.” Research in African Literatures , Spring, 1990 , Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 91-110.
Susan Arndt, The Dynamics of African Feminism: Defining and Classifying African-Feminist Literatures (2002)
Joyce Chadya, “Mother Politics: Anti-colonial Nationalism and the Woman Question in Africa.” Journal of Women’s History 15.3 (2003)
Elisabeth Bekers, Rising Anthills: African and African-American Writing on Female Genital Excision (2010)
Elleke Boehmer, Stories of Women: Gender and Narrative in the Postcolonial Nation (2005)
Mary Pauline Eboh, “The Woman Question: African and Western Perspectives”, in African Philosophy: An Anthology, ed. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998, 333-337
Anke Graneß, Martina Kopf, Magdalena Kraus, eds., Feministische Theorie aus Afrika, Asien und Latinamerika (2019)
Juliana M. Nfah-Abbenyi, Gender in African Women's Writing: Identity, Sexuality, and Difference (1997)
Gwendolyn Mikell, ed., African Feminism: The Politics of Survival in Sub-Saharan Africa (1997)
Obioma Nnaemeka, ed. The Politics of (M)Othering : Womanhood, Identity and Resistance in African Literature (1997)
Obioma Nnaemeka, ed., Sisterhood, Feminisms and Power: from Africa to the Diaspora (1998)
Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi, Africa Wo/Man Palawa: The Nigerian Novel by Women (1996)
Kirsten Holst Petersen, “First Things First: Problems of a Feminist Approach to African Literature” Kunapipi 6.3 (1984)
K. Holst-Petersen and A. Rutherford, eds., A Double Colonization: Colonial and Post-Colonial Women's Writing (1986)
Dobrota Pucherova, Feminism and Modernity in Anglophone African Women’s Writing: A 21st Century Global Context (2022)
Florence Stratton, Contemporary African Literature and the Politics of Gender (1994)

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

ÜAL1/1, ÜAL1/2, ÜAL2/1, ÜAL2/2, SAL/A, SAL/B, EC-148, EC-647, MA: SAL.VO.1, SAL.VO.2

Letzte Änderung: Mo 26.06.2023 09:07