Universität Wien FIND

180013 IK Rhetorik und Argumentationstheorie (2016W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

Zusammenfassung

1 Raleigh, Moodle
2 Schmitz, Moodle
4 Sampietro, Moodle

An/Abmeldung

Gruppen

Gruppe 1

max. 45 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Wednesdays, 09.45 – 11.15, Hörsaal 3F NIG (3. Stock)

Mittwoch 12.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 19.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Montag 14.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 16.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 23.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 30.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 07.12. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 14.12. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 11.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 18.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 25.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Course Outline: This course provides an introduction to the theory of argumentation. Its aim is to help you to understand the wide variety of forms of argument that exist – and understand which kinds of argument are good and which are bad – so that you will be able to argue and reason more effectively. The course will also introduce and explain a range of standard philosophical terms and distinctions so that you can read philosophical texts more fluently and avoid misusing technical terminology in your own philosophy essays. Some of the main questions we will explore include:
• What is an argument?
• What kinds of argument are there?
• How can we evaluate whether an argument is good or bad?
• What are the main kinds of fallacies in reasoning that we should try to avoid?
• How should we reason about chances and probability?

NOTE: This course will be conducted entirely in English!

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Recognise the logical form of deductive arguments
• Formulate their own examples of argument forms
• Be able to assess arguments for validity
• Be able to identify flaws in arguments
• Know the major fallacies to avoid and the ability to spot them
• Grasp the basics of Probability and Bayesian theory
• Understand and be able to correctly employ standard philosophical terminology

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Course Assessment: Approximately every 2-3 weeks there will be a 30-minute written exam in class (see schedule, below). There will also be other occasional shorter written exercises as homework. These tests and exercises will altogether account for 85% of your overall mark.
Course assessment will also take into account participation in class, which will account for 15% of your overall mark. This includes not only active participation in class activities – e.g. asking appropriate questions, suggesting examples, answering questions posed to the class, cooperating with fellow students in group exercises – but also punctuality and respectful behaviour towards the instructor and fellow students.

The handout for each lesson will be posted in Moodle immediately after class. The written exercises will NOT be available on Moodle. Students will have to be in class in order to take the in-class tests.

Literatur


Readings: There is no obligatory course textbook for this course. All that is required is that you follow the material presented in class carefully so that you are able to answer the written exercises. There are very many good introductory books on logic, probability, informal arguments or critical reasoning that interested students could usefully consult. However, the following books may well be especially useful as I have consulted them frequently when preparing this course:
• Baggini and Fosl "The Philosopher's Toolkit" (Wiley-Blackwell)
• Papineau "Philosophical Devices" (OUP)
• Kahnemann "Thinking, Fast and Slow" (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux)

Gruppe 2

Wir werden die Struktur von Sprechakten, grundlegende Formen des Schließens und Argumentierens sowie rhetorische Kunstgriffe anhand klassischer Texte von Searle, Peirce, Aristoteles und Schopenhauer studieren und dann auf dieser Basis einige philosophische Argumentationen analysieren.

max. 45 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Deutsch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Mittwoch 12.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 19.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 09.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 16.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 23.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 30.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 07.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 14.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 11.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 18.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock
Mittwoch 25.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 3B NIG 3.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Ziel ist es, ein grundlegendes Verständnis von Schlüssen und rhetorischen Mitteln zu erwerben und die Fähigkeit zu üben, dieses Verständnis selbstständig und kritisch bei der Analyse philosophischer Argumentationen anzuwenden. Methoden dazu werden schriftliche Vorbereitungen, Wiederholungen und Referate, Dozentenvortrag und die Seminardiskussion sein.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Stundenvorbereitungen, Wiederholungen und Referate, schriftliche Abschlussprüfung.

Literatur

Wird per Moodle zugänglich gemacht. Das Büchlein von Schopenhauer "Die Kunst, recht zu behalten" bitte anschaffen!

Gruppe 4

max. 45 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch
Lernplattform: Moodle

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

NOTE: This group will be taught in English!

Dienstag 11.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 18.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 25.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 08.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 15.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 22.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 29.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 06.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 13.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 10.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 17.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 24.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock
Dienstag 31.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 2i NIG 2.Stock

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Arguments play a central role in philosophy. The aim of this course is to introduce students to different argumentative schemes typically employed in philosophical writings and debates, as well as to familiarize them with the jargon used to talk about arguments. Students will acquire the skills to evaluate the effectiveness of arguments, including learning to spot argumentative flaws and fallacies. Additionally, some sessions will be dedicated to the history of argumentative theory and controversies over the role of persuasion and its limitations.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Attendance and class participation (incl. discussion inputs and exercises)
Presentation of part of a reading assignment
short exam
short essay

Literatur

Main texts:
Baggini, J. and Fosl, Peter. The Philosopher's Toolkit.
Groarke, Leo A. and Tindale, Christopher W. Good Reasoning Matters!
Toulin, S. The uses of Argument.

Additional readings:
Mercier, H and Sperber, D. "Why do humans reasons? Arguments for an
Argumentative Theory"
Meiland, Jack. "Argument as inquiry and argument as persuasion"
Scott, Robert. "On Viewing Rhetoric as Epistemic."

A complete syllabus will be handed out in the first session.
All reading material will be made available on Moodle.

Information

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Prüfungsstoff

Gesamter Inhalt der LV.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

BA 3.3
HPS M1.1, M1.3

Letzte Änderung: Mo 20.03.2017 15:23