Universität Wien
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180177 SE Analysis of Economic Concepts (2024S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung
VOR-ORT

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first served").

Details

max. 30 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

  • Dienstag 05.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 19.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 09.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 16.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 23.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 30.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 07.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 14.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 21.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 28.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 04.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Freitag 14.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 18.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
  • Dienstag 25.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Prerequisites:

Philosophy of Science (E.g., M2.P1 Central Topics and Texts in Theoretical Philosophy); Intermediate Microeconomics (E.g., M2.E1 Foundational Microeconomics); Basic game theory (E.g., Weeks 1 and 2 of the Coursera lectures from the University of British Columbia: Jackson et al, "Game Theory").

Course Outline:

Among the multitude of existing social phenomena, only a small fraction grabs the attention of economists. Not the fraction that we, faced with various life experiences and equipped with common sense concepts, would always expect or wish for. Two questions arise: Which social phenomena? Why these?

The second question is a very difficult one. Not everyone will be inclined to tackle it by means of the same strategy. Three widely used strategies are these:

1. Sociology of knowledge (emphasis on the influence of social, political, and economic factors on scientific practices);
2. History of thought (emphasis on tradition and continuity in scientific practices);
3. Normative epistemology and philosophy of science (emphasis on the normative features of scientific practices).

Each of these three strategies is legitimate, and each brings to light the importance of looking at prevailing scientific practices.

The goal of this seminar is to develop basic skills that will enable you to address, first and foremost, the first question (Which social phenomena?). To a lesser extent, we will also address the second question (Why these?), arguing that economic conceptualization is not independent of the scientific goals that are given a place of choice in economic practice.

The seminar has three phases. In phase 1, we cover some basics of philosophy of science, as applicable to economics. In phase 2 and 3, we investigate two particular topics (“Preferences” and “Markets”). We will base our investigations on a selection of paradigmatic exemplars, i.e, of pieces of research that had a structuring impact on the formation of mainstream economic concepts. For each of the two topics, we investigate:

1. How examplars endow economists with concepts that help them demarcate ‘economic phenomena’ from other phenomena;
2. How examplar-based economic concepts differ from close-by common sense, philosophical, or sociological concepts;
3. What examplar-based economic concepts reveal about economists’ prioritization of scientific goals.

Despite our focus on only two topics, general lessons should emerge. A successful student will have developed skills to:

1. Sort out ‘economic phenomena’ from ‘non-economic’ phenomena (according to mainstream standards and, with some work on their own, according to any standards);
2. Differentiate economic concepts from numerous false friends present in either of common sense-, social scientific-, and philosophical discourse.
3. Relate conceptual differences between economics and other fields to the scientific goals that characterize mainstream economic practices.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

There will be a series of weekly preparation tasks to hand in (via Moodle). These are intended as (1) a self-help device (i.e., they should help you figure out, prior to class, whether or not you paid sufficient attention to the reading assignment of the week) and (2) a basis for collective brain-storming. For these reasons, I will evaluate them along completeness criteria only. The scale (detailed below) is such that students can skip at least one of the weekly preparation tasks without losing a chance for a full grade.

On a week of her / his choosing, each student will have to make a video presentation of a relevant paper. This paper, pre-selected by the lecturer, will differ from the mandatory read of the week: it is meant to expand the groups’ horizon on the covered topic. Videos will be evaluated on three criteria (clarification of the relationship to the mandatory read, proper account of the paper’s main argument or model, clarity and audience friendliness), each of which is evaluated on a scale from 1 (“Very good”) to 5 (“Insufficient). The presentation grade is a weighted average of the three subgrades.

At the end of the term, the student will be asked to submit an essay. Detailed assessment criteria will be shared on Moodle in due time.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Your weekly preparation tasks will make up 25% of your final grade. They will be evaluated according to the following scale:

1: 85-100% of the questions are completed;
2: 75-84% of the questions are completed;
3: 60-74% of the questions are completed;
4: 50-59% of the questions are completed;
5: 0-49% of the questions are completed.
Your presentation will make up 25% of your final grade. It will be evaluated on a scale from 1 to 5, according to three criteria that will be detailed on Moodle.

Your final essay which makes up 50% of your final grade, will similarly be evaluated on a scale from 1 to 5.

A positive evaluation requires that you achieve a pass grade (4) in all assessment components, and that you actively attend the seminar. One unjustified absence will be excused. Each additional unjustified absence entails a penalty of 0.3 on the final grade.

Conditional on fulfilling the necessary requirements just mentioned, the final grade, comprised between 1 (“Very good”) and 4 (“Adequate”), is a rounded weighted average of the separate assessment grades. A failure to abide by one of the necessary requirements yields a 5 ("Insufficient").

Prüfungsstoff

Topic 1: General philosophy of economics – Essentials

Topic 2: Preferences

Topic 3: Markets

Literatur

Readings will be made available on MOODLE in due time. All assigned readings will be in English.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Di 14.05.2024 16:06