Universität Wien FIND

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230214 SE Comedo ergo sum (2017S)

Food and STS

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Hinweis: Ihr Anmeldezeitpunkt innerhalb der Frist hat keine Auswirkungen auf die Platzvergabe (kein "first come, first serve").

Details

max. 25 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Mittwoch 10.05. 12:00 - 14:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien (Vorbesprechung)
Donnerstag 01.06. 15:00 - 18:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Mittwoch 07.06. 12:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Montag 12.06. 11:00 - 14:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Mittwoch 14.06. 12:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Montag 19.06. 11:00 - 14:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Mittwoch 21.06. 12:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Montag 26.06. 11:00 - 14:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Food studies scholars regularly claim that 'food is cultural', by which they mean that food and eating are situated in local or regional practices or foodways. Meanwhile scientific knowledge about diet and nutrition purports to be universal. This course explores an emerging literature on the ways that science and technology, and scientists and engineers, work to reconstitute food as a stable immutable subject despite its plural cultural contexts and transitive material nature. The course will touch upon a variety of central topics in this recent literature at the intersection of food studies and STS: standards setting and the nature of commodities; food safety and the politics of risk; the food consumer-citizen as an (imagined) agent in (neoliberal) politics; the moralization of everyday dietary practices; and the branding, labeling, and market-making of science for consumption. Across these diverse topics we will focus on how the material is leveraged (either tamed or exploited) to settle cultural or political disputes. The goal is to look at this new literature and the new techniques from this intersection of food and STS to build a toolkit for thinking about food and power.
As the course title playfully suggests, food and eating form an intimate part of everyday life and are therefore closely linked to identity and notions of the self. Throughout we will therefore discuss the ways these technoscientific reconfigurations of food constitute new subjectivities, new notions of the eater and consumer self, as well resistances and counter-narratives.
Learning aims:
· to get an overview of the growing literature in the humanities and social sciences researching food, diet and health
· to read and discuss how STS researchers can contribute to this literature and its key themes and issues
· to develop a toolkit for studying food, diet, and eating as social practices shaped by technoscientific practices and discourses
· to be able to articulate how studying issues in food and diet, enmeshed as they are in the everyday, popular culture, industry and governance, can contribute to STS research on public understanding and engagement

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

To pass the seminar, students are expected to complete the following tasks:
- Participation. Your active engagement is required. Mere attendance is not enough.
- Personal essay. Submit a brief (1-2 page) personal essay describing your research interests, background, and interest in topics relating to this course. Full points are awarded for completion. These are to be handed in via e-mail (frohlich@alum.mit.edu) and uploaded on Moodle
(http://moodle.univie.ac.at ) by Tuesday, June 6th, 2017.
- Reading responses. For each session, every student has to hand in a reading response (maximum 400 words) that engages with at least one of the required reading(s). These contributions
should critically reflect upon the reading and offer the student’s own position towards the author’s main arguments. The responses are to help me facilitate discussion during the class. Reading responses are to be handed in via e-mail (frohlich@alum.mit.edu) and uploaded on Moodle (http://moodle.univie.ac.at ) no later than 5pm the evening before each session. (This is not required for the first class on 01/06/2017.)
- Presentation of class readings. Each class, 3 students will be required to start class discussion by briefly (less than 5 minutes each) summarizing the main arguments of the 3 required readings for that class. Each student will be responsible for one reading. In lieu of the reading response for that class, the student will prepare a 1-page handout for the class on that reading, which should provide a 1-2 sentence summary of the article’s main argument, explains the main legal case(s) discussed in the
article as well as its/their legal reasoning and social significance, identifies important theoretical or analytical concepts deployed by the author(s) in the article, and lists 1-2 questions to start class
discussion.
- Final project. Choose only one of the two following options:
a) Submit an approx. 2000-word essay that situates a food object or event (news happening) in its broader context, drawing upon the readings and ideas discussed in this class. The idea is
to take advantage of how food topics saturate everyday life by writing an analysis of an 'evocative object' (Turkle, 2007) that blends rich physical description of this thing with a discussion (grounded in references to STS literature) of the object or event’s psychology, the social or technoscientific movements which frame its psychosocial meanings, and/or situating it
within a technological system.
b) Write two approx. 800-word blog entries that link some salient, public controversy about food to topics and readings discussed in the course. It is important to find relevant visuals to
illustrate each entry topic. Please confirm blog topics with the course professor in advance.
Final projects are to be completed and handed in via email (frohlich@alum.mit.edu) and Moodle by midnight, July 24, 2017.

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Grading Scheme
The grading scheme is based on a total of 100 points. These points will be awarded in relation to students’ performance in meeting the course learning aims in the different obligatory tasks.
The maximum number of points to be acquired for each task is:
Active Participation in Class: 10 points, assessed individually, no feedback
Personal Essay: 10 points, assessed individually, no feedback
Reading Responses: 30 points, assessed individually, feedback on request
Presentation: 20 points, assessed individually, feedback on request
Final Project: 30 points, assessed individually, feedback by lecturer

Minimum requirements
A minimum of 50 points is necessary to successfully complete the course. Failure to meet the attendance regulations, to deliver course assignments on time or to adhere to standards of academic work may result in a deduction of points.
Grades
100-87 points Excellent (1)
86-75 points Good (2)
74-63 points Satisfactory (3)
62-50 points Sufficient (4)
49-0 points Unsatisfactory (5) (fail)

Attendance
Presence and participation is compulsory. Absences of four hours at maximum are tolerated, provided that the lecturer is informed about the absence. Absences of up to eight hours in total may be compensated by either a deduction of grading points or/and extra work agreed with the lecturer. Whether compensation is possible is
decided by the lecturer.
Absences of more than eight hours in total cannot be compensated. In this case, or if the lecturer does not allow a student to compensate absences of more than four hours, the course cannot be completed and is graded as a ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfil the attendance requirements on the student’s side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

Important Grading Information
If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme and the attendance regulations must be met. If a required task is not fulfilled, e.g. a required assignment is not handed in or if the student does not meet the attendance requirements, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course.
In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.
If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’. Self-plagiarism, particularly re-using own work handed in for other courses, will be treated likewise.

Prüfungsstoff

Literatur


Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

Letzte Änderung: Mo 07.09.2020 15:39