Universität Wien FIND
Warning! The directory is not yet complete and will be amended until the beginning of the term.

030454 SE Alternative Development Policies and the Law (2016S)

A look at the implications on legal systems and legal practitioners of some of the alternatives being proposed to the orthodox "Washington Consensus" model of international development

3.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 3 - Rechtswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 16.03. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum SEM64 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG (Kickoff Class)
Thursday 02.06. 09:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum SEM34 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 3.OG
Friday 03.06. 09:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum SEM52 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 5.OG
Saturday 04.06. 09:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM34 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 3.OG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This seminar will focus on the newest generation of development paradigms – the so-called “alternative development strategies.” Definitions of what makes a development paradigm “alternative” are hard to come by: most are defined primarily by what they are not. Alternative development strategies typically do not adhere strictly to the prescriptions of the “Washington Consensus” – the policy prescriptions promoted during the 1990s and early 2000s by the United States government and other governments in the developed “Global North,” the World Bank (WB), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Assessment and permitted materials

For all students, grading will be based as follows:
30% Regular attendance, class preparation, and participation
50% 12-15 page final seminar paper
20% Team presentation during ADA conference

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The bulk of the course will take place during the week of June 6th. Given the condensed nature of the course, the seminar during this week will resemble an intensive 4-day workshop, where each student will contribute substantively to the collective learning process. The highlight of the week will be an all-day conference, co-hosted by the Austrian Development Agency (ADA). Students will present their learning during this open-door conference and receive direct feedback and input from some of Austria’s pre-eminent development practitioners.

The seminar will be capped at 20 students. Slots in the course will be filled on a first-come, first serve basis. Students from all university faculties are encouraged to apply. No prior knowledge of the law is necessary to join the course.

Examination topics

TOPIC AREA #1: PROMINENT CRITIQUES OF “MAINSTREAM” DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES
Paper Topic #1: Legal Implications of the Washington Consensus Orthodoxy
Paper Topic #2: Economic Critiques of the Washington Consensus
Paper Topic #3: Social and Political Critiques of the Washington Consensus
Paper Topic #4: Legal Critiques of the Washington Consensus

TOPIC AREA #2: META-THEORETICAL EVOLUTIONS IN THINKING ABOUT GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT
Paper Topic #5: Socialist (or Communist) Development Strategies
Paper Topic #6: Economic, Social and Cultural (ESC) Human Rights as an ADS?
Paper Topic #7: Human Security or Human Development as an ADS?
Paper Topic #8: “Degrowth” or “Flat Growth” Development Paradigms

TOPIC AREA #3: DEMAND-SIDE EVOLUTIONS IN THINKING ABOUT GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT
Paper Topic #9: The emergence of Bhutanese “Gross National Happiness” (GNH) as an ADS
Paper Topic #10: The emergence of Latin American Buon Viver as an ADS
Paper Topic #11: Grassroots Mobilization Efforts to Insist on Alternative Development Policies
Paper Topic #12: The East Asian (S. Korean, Taiwanese, People’s Republic of Chinese, Dubai) “development state” model of development

TOPIC AREA #4: SUPPLY-SIDE EVOLUTIONS IN THINKING ABOUT GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT
Paper Topic #13: Post-Washington Consensus thinking in Washington D.C.: Evolution or Status Quo at the World Bank and IMF?
Paper Topic #14 & 15: Post-Washington Consensus thinking at the UN: The U.N. Millennium Development Goals (Paper Topic #14) and Sustainable Development Goals (Paper Topic #15)
Paper Topic #16: Post-Washington Consensus thinking among bilateral aid agencies: The Case of national development aid programs (ex: ADA, DFID, GTZ, USAID, JAICA, etc.)
Paper Topic #17: Post-Washington Consensus thinking among International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) and development foundations: The case of private development aid assistance programing (ex: Oxfam, ActionAid, Save the Children, etc.)

TOPIC AREA #5: “RULE OF LAW” PROGRAMMING AS PART OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Paper Topic #18: “Rule of Law” programming: efforts to promote access to justice
Paper Topic #19: “Rule of Law” programming: ensuring consistency with global (human rights) norms
Paper Topic #20: “Rule of Law” programming: anti-corruption efforts

Reading list

All readings for this class are contained in a course packet, which we will make available to you electronically via dropbox on the first day of class. For that to happen, please fill in your name and email legibly on the sign-up sheet circulated during class.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 31.08.2018 08:47