Universität Wien FIND

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, changes to courses and exams may be necessary at short notice. Inform yourself about the current status on u:find and check your e-mails regularly. Registration is mandatory for courses and exams. Wearing a FFP2 face mask and a valid evidence of being tested, vaccinated or have recovered from an infection are mandatory on site.

Please read the information on studieren.univie.ac.at/en/info.

030502 KU Transformations of Constitutionalism (2017S)

also for diploma and doctoral students

3.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 3 - Rechtswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 20.03. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 27.03. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 03.04. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Thursday 06.04. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum SEM33 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 3.OG
Monday 24.04. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 08.05. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 15.05. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 22.05. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 29.05. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 12.06. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Tuesday 13.06. 11:45 - 13:15 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG
Monday 19.06. 12:00 - 13:30 Hörsaal Rechtswissenschaften Schenkenstraße 8-10, 4.OG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

We are currently witness to the emergence of a third wave of the constitutionalist project. It raises the question what remains of the original ideas.
Constitutionalism 1.0 is the old-fashioned project to create and sustain limited government. The basic tools thereto are jurisdictional constraints and negative rights. The constitution is understood to be a written document, authored by a people. Its application is to be based upon interpretation. This is the world as created by the American (and the French) revolution.
Constitutionalism 2.0 accords to the constitution an even more important role. It is supposed to inform the creation of optimal government. Therefore, the constitution does not only limit; it guides. Adjudicating bodies loom large. That the constitution is written matters very little. The constitution is but another name for the precepts of practical reason. With regard to the scope of its authority, the constitution becomes “total.” The paradigmatic case for this type of constitution is post-war Germany.
Constitutionalism 3.0, roughly speaking, stands for the constitution in the process of denationalization. In several respects, the authority of the constitution becomes recast from a cosmopolitan perspective. However, it denotes also the situation in which the constitution—owing to transnational forces—is increasingly confronted with its own limitations and encounters its “other.” The relevant keywords are multilevel systems, pluralism, the rise of executive authority or the normalcy of emergency rule.
The class does not suggest that we observe a historical sequence in the course of which one constitutionalism replaces the other; rather successor versions become grafted upon their predecessor.
aim: offers a solid historical overview of constitutionalism.

Assessment and permitted materials

written final exam (2 hours), classroom participation.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

assessment of classroom participation and written exam.

Examination topics

Reading list

Downloadable resources in moodle.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:28