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030512 KU Environmental Law Aspects of International Disputes (2018W)

3.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 3 - Rechtswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 40 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 12.11. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM62 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG
Tuesday 13.11. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM52 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 5.OG
Wednesday 14.11. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM31 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 3.OG
Thursday 15.11. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM31 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 3.OG
Friday 16.11. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM51 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 5.OG
Monday 14.01. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM42 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum, 4.OG
Tuesday 15.01. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM61 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG
Wednesday 16.01. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM62 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG
Thursday 17.01. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM63 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG
Friday 18.01. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum SEM52 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 5.OG
Wednesday 23.01. 17:00 - 19:00 Seminarraum SEM64 Schottenbastei 10-16, Juridicum 6.OG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The course will be primarily focused on the multi-faceted dimension of environment-related international disputes. To that end, the course will address the different bodies of international law, the different dispute settlement mechanisms and the different subjects and jurisdictions which pertain to conflicts of interests on the right to a healthy environment and to the equitable and reasonable allocation, utilization and protection of natural resources.
The course will first illustrate the main normative features of international environmental law and the rights and obligations stemming therefrom, whose interpretation and application may give rise to international disputes. Special attention will be devoted to the inter-State dimension of potential environment-related disputes, as well as the human right dimension of breaches of environmental law. The distinction between State responsibility, State liability and compliance review mechanisms will be illustrated.
The course will also illustrate the trend shifting the State responsibility dimension for activities carried out by private economic entities to the domestic liability dimension in a transboundary judicial context.

Assessment and permitted materials

Written paper

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list

Before the beginning of the course, students are recommended to read:

1. Alan Boyle, ‘Environmental Dispute Settlement’, MPEPIL (April 2009).
2. John G. Merrills, International Dispute Settlement (6th edn; CUP 2017), Chapters 5 (‘Arbitration’; at 88-123), 6 (‘The International Court I: Organisation and Procedure’; at 124-151), 7 (‘The International Court II: The Work of the Court’; at 152-176), 8 (‘The Law of the Sea Convention’; at 177-204) and 9 (‘International Trade Disputes’; at 205-234).
3. Philippe Sands, Jacqueline Peel, Principles of International Environmental Law (3rd edn, CUP 2012), Chapters 18 (‘Human rights and armed conflicts’; limited to 775-789), 19 (‘International Trade and Competition’, limited to 799-861) and 20 (‘Foreign Investment’; at 869-886).

Further suggested readings:

1. Alan Boyle, ‘Human Rights and the Environment: Where Next?’ in J. E. Viñuales, E. Lees (eds), Environmental and Energy Law. Volume I: International Dimensions (Edward Elgar 2017) 244
2. Pierre-Marie Dupuy and Jorge E. Viñuales, International Environmental Law (2nd edn, CUP 2018), Chapters 10 (‘Human Rights and the Environment’; at 357-403), 12.2 (‘Foreign Investment and the Environment in International Law’; at 452-472) and 12.3 (‘Environmental Protection and International Trade Law’; at 472-490).
3. Inter-American Court of Human Rights, ‘Environment and Human Rights’, Advisory Opinion OC-23/17, 15 November 2017.
4. Gabrielle Marceau, ‘A Comment on the Appellate Body Report in “EC-Seal Products” in the Context of the Trade and Environment Debate’ (2014) 23 RECIEL 318.
5. Laura Pineschi, ‘The Duty of Environmental Impact Assessment in the First ITLOS Chamber’s Advisory Opinion: towards the Supremacy of the General Rule to protect and preserve the Marine Environment as a Common Value?’ in N. Boschiero et al. (eds), International courts and the development of international law: essays in honour of Tullio Treves (Asser 2013) 425.
6. Yasuhiro Shigeta, ‘Obligation to Protect the Environment in the ICJ’s Practice: To What Extent Erga Omnes?’ (2012) 55 JYIL 176.
7. Attila Tanzi, ‘Bridging the Gap between International Investment Law and the Right of Access to Water’ in Y. Levashova, T. Lambooy and I. Dekker (eds), Bridging the Gap between International Investment Law and the Environment (Eleven 2016) 187.
8. Attila Tanzi, Cristina Contartese, ‘Dispute Prevention, Dispute Settlements and Implementation Facilitation in International Water Law: The Added Value of the Establishment of an Implementation Mechanism under the Water Convention’ in A. Tanzi et al., The UNECE Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes (Brill-Martinus Nijhoff 2015) 319.
9. Attila Tanzi, Enrico Milano, ‘Article 33 of the UN Watercourse Convention: a step forward for dispute settlement’ (2013) 38 Wat. Int’l 166.
10. Jorge E. Viñuales, ‘Foreign Investment and the Environment in International Law: An Ambiguous Relationship’ in J. E. Viñuales, E. Lees (eds), Environmental and Energy Law. Volume I: International Dimensions (Edward Elgar 2017) 244.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 25.02.2019 15:27