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040112 UK Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics (MA) (2020W)

Track in Behavioral Economics and Experiments

8.00 ECTS (4.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first serve).

Details

max. 50 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

CORONA-Update [Sep. 20]: As corona conditions deteriorate somewhat, I intend to provide more “online lectures” (videos, not live) with background information and fewer live “meetings” as original thought (ideally in person or online) in which we discuss papers. In any case, it is also possible to take part in the course online-only and do a presentation online. Further information will be provided before the first lecture. [Open to PhD students]

Thursday 01.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 02.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 08.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 09.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 15.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 16.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 22.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 23.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 29.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 30.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 05.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 06.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 12.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 13.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 19.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 20.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 26.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 27.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 03.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 04.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 10.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 11.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 17.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 18.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 07.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 08.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 14.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 15.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 21.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 22.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock
Thursday 28.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 1 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Friday 29.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum 14 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 2.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Behavioral and experimental economics is a vibrant field of research which sheds new light on many old and important issues in economics. Broadly speaking, behavioral and experimental economics tries to incorporate insights from psychology (and other fields) to better explain human behavior in economic interaction. The goal of the course is to give students an overview of this area.

We will look both at questions of basic research and more applied investigations that directly speak to issues that are currently in the political debate. Regarding basic research, we will consider two main topics: Fairness and bounded rationality. Related questions, we try to answer are:

Fairness/Altruism: Are people generally altruistic or selfish? Given some evidence for altruism, how robust is this kind of behavior? Do people really want to help others or do they only want to be seen as altruistic?; bounded rationality: How rational are people? Why are people making plans they cannot fulfill? Will people vote for a rational policy change if the benefits are in the future?

Regarding more applied behavioral research, a broader range of topic will be considered. Among them: global warming, populism and anti-migration sentiments, corona crisis. Generally, we will ask whether behavioral economics can help us better understand the problems. Related questions:

Corona: How can the risk of a second wave be minimized? What strategies do behavioral scientist suggest to mitigate the problem? Environment: Why is it so difficult to combat global warming? Does behavioral economics have a solution how the underlying free-riding problem can be solved? Populism/Migration: Why has populism (e.g. Brexit, Trump) been on the rise lately? According to behavioral insights, how should (efficiency-enhancing) migration be organized to ensure that natives support it?

Assessment and permitted materials

Overall, there will be 24 “meetings” (some in classroom or online, as well as some online material). The general idea of the course is that we will read and discuss academic papers in most of these meetings. This will give you the chance to practice your presenting (and potentially writing) skills. In our first meeting, I will present a list of papers. Each student selects one (or more) papers that s/he reads more carefully and provides a short introductory presentation (about 15min). Afterwards, we discuss questions of methodology as well as questions on context and interpretation.

We will discuss grading during the first lecture. But the general idea is the following. There are three elements (with 1/3 weight each):

- 1) Participation: Attendance in class (or online) (with reasonable exceptions and depending on circumstances – see below) and contributions to the class discussion
- 2) Mandatory introductory presentation of one paper of your choice (in classroom, online or as a pre-prepared podcast)
- 3) Presentation of a second paper or, alternatively a short term paper

If you receive a passing grade in all three elements, you pass the course. If there is any need at all, there may also be a chance to do some further work (e.g. another presentation) to improve/substitute one of the three (sub)grades.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Some knowledge in basic game-theoretic concepts and basic microeconomics is required. While some knowledge in experimental and behavioral economics is also helpful, interest in one of those two areas will be sufficient.

Examination topics

As indicated above, there will not be a midterm or final exam. Students are mainly expected to learn to read and discuss a paper and, most importantly, improve their presenting (and possibly writing) skills.

Reading list

As indicated above, there will not be a midterm or final exam. Students are mainly expected to learn to read and discuss a paper and, most importantly, improve their presenting (and possibly writing) skills.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Tu 29.09.2020 11:08