Universität Wien

040200 KU Economic Sociology - Basics (MA) (2021W)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Summary

1 MIXED Kalleitner , Moodle
2 REMOTE Resch , Moodle
3 REMOTE Ausserladscheider , Moodle

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).
Registration information is available for each group.

Groups

Group 1

max. 50 participants
Language: German
LMS: Moodle

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 05.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 12.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 19.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 09.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 16.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 23.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 30.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 07.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 14.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 11.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 18.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß
Tuesday 25.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 5 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 Erdgeschoß

Aims, contents and method of the course

Starting from the classic concept of embeddedness coined by Schumpeter and popularized by Granovetter, we will try to understand the economy and the quest for scare goods focusing on three forms of (market) integration: reciprocity, exchange, and redistribution. Understanding economy as embedded in social and cultural institutions and customs will help us to focus on the interrelationship between structure and agency central to sociological analyses. To do that we will read, on the one hand, several theoretical “classics” to get a basic understanding how economic relationships can be understood from a sociological viewpoint and, on the other hand, state of the art empirical analyses to see whether these theoretical models can help us understand actual empirical phenomena.
All students have to read the compulsory readings ahead of lessons and answer several questions on these texts. Students will present the texts and their own ideas on a follow up research question and a suitable research design in class. At the end of the semester students have to hand in a research proposal on the topic of the presentation.
The course is “prüfungsimmanent”. This semester this means that we will have synchronous online and offline lessons on the dates specified above. The number and style of the offline sessions will depend on the status of the pandemic at that time. To enter these “virtual lectures” you will find a link in moodle. Sufficient hardware to participate actively in the course is mandatory (camera, microphone, headphones).

Assessment and permitted materials

Ahead of every lesson students will have to answer (2-3) short questions on the mandatory questions and provide a short research question that relates to the topic/theory/method discussed in the text. Together in small groups students will give one short presentation discussing an empirical research question and a fitting research design explaining how they would conduct the research. Students are expected to actively participate in the course by participating in the discussions after following these presentations. At the end of the semester students (individually) will write a research proposal, which will develop the research question discussed in the presentations (~2000 words). Ahead of this research proposal students will have to hand in an abstract which, on demand, can be discussed with the instructor. Students will receive guidance on how to write scientific abstracts and research proposals in the course. The specific deadlines will be provided on moodle.
All written contributions are tested for plagiarism with the software Turnitin provided in moodle.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The minimum requirement for receiving a positive grade includes the attendance of the course (max. 2 absences), the duly upload of the answers to the questions on the compulsory readings, the presentation of the research question and the delivery of a complete research proposal, in line with the specifications provided in the lectures.
Grade criteria:
• Answers to the questions on the compulsory readings (25%)
• Active participation during the lessons (10%)
• Presentation of the research proposal (20%)
• Abstract (5%)
• Research proposal (40%)

Examination topics

Refer to the literature

Reading list

Adloff F and Mau S. (2006) Giving Social Ties, Reciprocity in Modern Society. European Journal of Sociology 47: 93-123.
Alesina A and Giuliano P. (2011) Preferences for Redistribution. In: Benhabib J, Bisin A and Jackson MO (eds) Handbook of Social Economics. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 93-131.
Arts W and Gelissen J. (2002) Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism or More? A State-of-the-Art Report. Journal of European Social Policy 12: 137-158.
Beckert J and Wehninger F. (2013) In the Shadow: Illegal Markets and Economic Sociology. Socio-Economic Review 11: 5-30.
Beckert J. (2011) Where Do Prices Come From? Sociological Approaches to Price Formation. Socio-Economic Review 9: 757-786.
Brewster Stearns L and Mizruchi MS. (2005) Banking and Financial Markets. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 284-306.
Carruthers BG. (2005) The Sociology of Money and Credit. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 355-378.
Falk A and Szech N. (2013) Morals and Markets. Science 340: 707-711.
Fehr E and Gintis H. (2007) Human Motivation and Social Cooperation: Experimental and Analytical Foundations. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 43-64.
Fligstein N and Dauter L. (2007) The Sociology of Markets. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 105-128.
Gallie D. (2007) Production Regimes and the Quality of Employment in Europe. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 85-104.
Gouldner A. (1960) The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement. American Sociological Review 25: 161-178.
Granovetter M. (1985) Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness. The American Journal of Sociology 91: 481-510.
Guala F. (2012) Reciprocity: Weak or Strong? What Punishment Experiments Do (and do not) Demonstrate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35: 1-59.
Huber E and Stephens JD. (2005) Welfare States and the Economy. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 552-574.
Krippner GR and Alvarez AS. (2007) Embeddedness and the Intellectual Projects of Economic Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 219-240.
Liebig S and Sauer C. (2015) Sociology of Justice. In: Sabbagh C and Schmitt M (eds) Handbook of Social Justice Theory and Research. Berlin: Springer, 37-59.
Mauss M. (1968 [1925]) Die Gabe. Die Form und Funktion des Austauschs in archaischen Gesellschaften, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp.
Molm LD, Collett JL and Schaefer DR. (2007) Building Solidarity through Generalized Exchange: A Theory of Reciprocity. American Journal of Sociology 113: 205-242.
Portes A and Sensenbrenner J. (1993) Embeddedness and Immigration: Notes on the Social Determinants of Economic Action. American Journal of Sociology 98: 1320-1350.
Portes A. (1998) Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 24: 1-24.
Smelser NJ and Swedberg R. (2005) Introducing Economic Sociology. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 3-25.
Smith-Doerr L and Powell WW. (2005) Networks and Economic Life. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 379-402.
Streeck W. (2005) The Sociology of Labor Markets and Trade Unions. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 254-283.
Swedberg R. (2005) Markets in Society. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 233-253.

Group 2

max. 50 participants
Language: German
LMS: Moodle

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 04.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 11.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 18.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 25.10. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 08.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 15.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 22.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 29.11. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 06.12. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 13.12. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 10.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 17.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 24.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital
Monday 31.01. 11:30 - 13:00 Digital

Aims, contents and method of the course

Ausgehend vom Konzept der Einbettung wirtschaftlichen Handelns in gesellschaftliche Strukturen und von der klassischen Unterscheidung zwischen den drei Integrationsformen der Wirtschaft – Reziprozität, Marktaustausch und Umverteilung – werden verschiedene soziologische Perspektiven auf wirtschaftliche Zusammenhänge an Hand von Originaltexten vorgestellt und diskutiert. Jede Integrationsform wird im Hinblick auf ihre Bedeutung für die Verknüpfung der makroökonomischen und der mikroökonomischen Perspektive untersucht. Der Fokus liegt dabei auf der Weise, in der die drei Integrationsformen zur Ausgestaltung moderner Ökonomien beitragen und in der sie unternehmerische Entscheidungen beeinflussen.
Alle Teilnehmenden haben die Pflichttexte vor der Lehrveranstaltungseinheit zu lesen. Die Studierenden präsentieren an Hand der Texte sowie eigener Recherchen zu den Themen der Einheiten und diskutieren die in der Einheit aufgeworfenen Fragen.
Abschließend ist, basierend auf den gewählten Themen, eine reduzierte Forschungsarbeit zu verfassen.
HINWEIS:
Die Lehrveranstaltung (LV) ist prüfungsimmanent und wird u.a. als synchrone online Einheit zum angegebenen Termin abgehalten. Der Zutritt zum virtuellen Hörsaal erfolgt über Moodle. Eine geeignete Hardware (inkl. Kamera, Mikrophon und Lautsprecher/Kopfhörer) sowie Internetanbindung sind dementsprechend Voraussetzung zur Teilnahme.

Assessment and permitted materials

Zur Pflichtlektüre ist individuell vor jeder Einheit ein schriftliches Statement zu formulieren. In Kleingruppen wird eine Präsentation zu einem gewählten Forschungsthema gehalten. Die TeilnehmerInnen beteiligen sich aktiv per Chat an den Diskussionen im Anschluss an die Präsentationen. Abschließend ist bezüglich des Themas eine reduzierte Forschungsarbeit zu verfassen.
Alle schriftlichen Beiträge werden über Moodle abgegeben, wobei die Plagiatsprüfungssoftware Turnitin zum Einsatz kommt.
Damit verbundene Abgabetermine (Fristen beachten!) werden auf Moodle bekanntgegeben.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Mindestanforderung für die positive Beurteilung sind die aktive Teilnahme in den Lehrveranstaltungseinheiten, die pünktliche Abgabe der Statements, die Abhaltung einer Präsentation und die Abfassung der Forschungsarbeit gemäß den Vorgaben der Lehrveranstaltungsleitung.
Beurteilungsmaßstab:
Beantwortungen der Fragen zur Literatur (25%)
• Mitarbeit (10%)
• Präsentation (20%)
• Abstract (5%)
• Forschungsexposé (40%)

Examination topics

Siehe Literatur

Reading list

Adloff F and Mau S. (2006) Giving Social Ties, Reciprocity in Modern Society. European Journal of Sociology 47: 93-123.
Alesina A and Giuliano P. (2011) Preferences for Redistribution. In: Benhabib J, Bisin A and Jackson MO (eds) Handbook of Social Economics. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 93-131.
Arts W and Gelissen J. (2002) Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism or More? A State-of-the-Art Report. Journal of European Social Policy 12: 137-158.
Beckert J and Wehninger F. (2013) In the Shadow: Illegal Markets and Economic Sociology. Socio-Economic Review 11: 5-30.
Beckert J. (2011) Where Do Prices Come From? Sociological Approaches to Price Formation. Socio-Economic Review 9: 757-786.
Brewster Stearns L and Mizruchi MS. (2005) Banking and Financial Markets. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 284-306.
Carruthers BG. (2005) The Sociology of Money and Credit. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 355-378.
Falk A and Szech N. (2013) Morals and Markets. Science 340: 707-711.
Fehr E and Gintis H. (2007) Human Motivation and Social Cooperation: Experimental and Analytical Foundations. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 43-64.
Fligstein N and Dauter L. (2007) The Sociology of Markets. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 105-128.
Gallie D. (2007) Production Regimes and the Quality of Employment in Europe. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 85-104.
Gouldner A. (1960) The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement. American Sociological Review 25: 161-178.
Granovetter M. (1985) Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness. The American Journal of Sociology 91: 481-510.
Guala F. (2012) Reciprocity: Weak or Strong? What Punishment Experiments Do (and do not) Demonstrate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35: 1-59.
Huber E and Stephens JD. (2005) Welfare States and the Economy. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 552-574.
Krippner GR and Alvarez AS. (2007) Embeddedness and the Intellectual Projects of Economic Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 219-240.
Liebig S and Sauer C. (2015) Sociology of Justice. In: Sabbagh C and Schmitt M (eds) Handbook of Social Justice Theory and Research. Berlin: Springer, 37-59.
Mauss M. (1968 [1925]) Die Gabe. Die Form und Funktion des Austauschs in archaischen Gesellschaften, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp.
Molm LD, Collett JL and Schaefer DR. (2007) Building Solidarity through Generalized Exchange: A Theory of Reciprocity. American Journal of Sociology 113: 205-242.
Portes A and Sensenbrenner J. (1993) Embeddedness and Immigration: Notes on the Social Determinants of Economic Action. American Journal of Sociology 98: 1320-1350.
Portes A. (1998) Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 24: 1-24.
Smelser NJ and Swedberg R. (2005) Introducing Economic Sociology. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 3-25.
Smith-Doerr L and Powell WW. (2005) Networks and Economic Life. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 379-402.
Streeck W. (2005) The Sociology of Labor Markets and Trade Unions. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 254-283.
Swedberg R. (2005) Markets in Society. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 233-253.

Group 3

max. 50 participants
Language: English
LMS: Moodle

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 06.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 13.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 20.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 27.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 03.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 10.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 17.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 24.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Seminarraum 17, Kolingasse 14-16, OG02
Wednesday 01.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 15.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Seminarraum 17, Kolingasse 14-16, OG02
Wednesday 12.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 19.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital
Wednesday 26.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Digital

Aims, contents and method of the course

Starting from the sociological concept of 'embeddedness', we will try to understand the economy and the quest for scarce goods focusing on three forms of (market) integration: reciprocity, exchange, and redistribution. Understanding economy as embedded in social and cultural institutions will help us to focus on the interrelationship between structure and agency, central to sociological analyses. To do that we will read several theoretical “classics” to get a basic understanding how economic relationships can be understood from a sociological viewpoint. Based on this, we will consider whether these theoretical models can help us understand empirical phenomena.
All students have to read the compulsory readings ahead of lessons and answer several questions based on these texts. Students will present the texts and their own ideas. At the end of the semester students will produce a research proposal on the topic of their choice, which builds on the concepts learned in class and extrapolates empirical designs.

Assessment and permitted materials

The seminar is "prüfungsimmanent" meaning that students will be assessed throughout the entirety of the taught lessons. Ahead of every lesson students will have to write a statement based on the mandatory readings (25% of the grade). Together in small groups students will give one short presentation discussing an empirical research question and a fitting research design explaining how they would conduct the research (20%). Students are expected to actively participate in the course by participating in the discussions after following these presentations (15%). At the end of the semester students (individually) will write a research proposal, which can be based on the research question discussed in the presentations (~2000 words; 40%). Ahead of this research proposal students can hand in an abstract, if they like feedback prior to the submission of the research proposal. The specific deadlines will be provided on moodle. All written contributions are tested for plagiarism with the software Turnitin provided in moodle.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The minimum requirement for receiving a positive grade includes the attendance of the course (max. 2 absences), and a positive assessment of minimum 60% of the grade, which is composed of the duly upload of the statements on the compulsory readings, the presentation, and the delivery of a complete research proposal, in line with the specifications provided in the lectures.
Grade criteria:
• Answers to the questions on the compulsory readings (25%)
• Active participation during the lessons (15%)
• Presentation (20%)
• Research proposal (40%)

Examination topics

See Reading List (subject to change)

Reading list

subject to change:
Adloff F and Mau S. (2006) Giving Social Ties, Reciprocity in Modern Society. European Journal of Sociology 47: 93-123.
Alesina A and Giuliano P. (2011) Preferences for Redistribution. In: Benhabib J, Bisin A and Jackson MO (eds) Handbook of Social Economics. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 93-131.
Arts W and Gelissen J. (2002) Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism or More? A State-of-the-Art Report. Journal of European Social Policy 12: 137-158.
Beckert J and Wehninger F. (2013) In the Shadow: Illegal Markets and Economic Sociology. Socio-Economic Review 11: 5-30.
Beckert J. (2011) Where Do Prices Come From? Sociological Approaches to Price Formation. Socio-Economic Review 9: 757-786.
Brewster Stearns L and Mizruchi MS. (2005) Banking and Financial Markets. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 284-306.
Carruthers BG. (2005) The Sociology of Money and Credit. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 355-378.
Falk A and Szech N. (2013) Morals and Markets. Science 340: 707-711.
Fehr E and Gintis H. (2007) Human Motivation and Social Cooperation: Experimental and Analytical Foundations. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 43-64.
Fligstein N and Dauter L. (2007) The Sociology of Markets. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 105-128.
Gallie D. (2007) Production Regimes and the Quality of Employment in Europe. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 85-104.
Gouldner A. (1960) The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement. American Sociological Review 25: 161-178.
Granovetter M. (1985) Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness. The American Journal of Sociology 91: 481-510.
Guala F. (2012) Reciprocity: Weak or Strong? What Punishment Experiments Do (and do not) Demonstrate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35: 1-59.
Huber E and Stephens JD. (2005) Welfare States and the Economy. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 552-574.
Krippner GR and Alvarez AS. (2007) Embeddedness and the Intellectual Projects of Economic Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 33: 219-240.
Liebig S and Sauer C. (2015) Sociology of Justice. In: Sabbagh C and Schmitt M (eds) Handbook of Social Justice Theory and Research. Berlin: Springer, 37-59.
Mauss M. (1968 [1925]) Die Gabe. Die Form und Funktion des Austauschs in archaischen Gesellschaften, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp.
Molm LD, Collett JL and Schaefer DR. (2007) Building Solidarity through Generalized Exchange: A Theory of Reciprocity. American Journal of Sociology 113: 205-242.
Portes A and Sensenbrenner J. (1993) Embeddedness and Immigration: Notes on the Social Determinants of Economic Action. American Journal of Sociology 98: 1320-1350.
Portes A. (1998) Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. Annual Review of Sociology 24: 1-24.
Smelser NJ and Swedberg R. (2005) Introducing Economic Sociology. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 3-25.
Smith-Doerr L and Powell WW. (2005) Networks and Economic Life. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) Handbook of Economic Sociology (2nd ed.). Princeton: Princeton University Press, 379-402.
Streeck W. (2005) The Sociology of Labor Markets and Trade Unions. In: Smelser N and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 254-283.
Swedberg R. (2005) Markets in Society. In: Smelser NJ and Swedberg R (eds) The Handbook of Economic Sociology. New York: Russell Sage, 233-253.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 12.05.2023 00:12