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040220 SE Seminar Organization and Personnel (MA) (2021S)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 4 - Wirtschaftswissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Summary

1 REMOTE Vetschera , Moodle
2 MIXED Fabel , Moodle

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).
Registration information is available for each group.

Groups

Group 1

service email address: opim.bda@univie.ac.at

max. 24 participants
Language: English
LMS: Moodle

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 08.03. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital (Kickoff Class)
Monday 26.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Friday 30.04. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 03.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Friday 07.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 10.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 17.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Friday 28.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 31.05. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Friday 11.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 14.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Friday 18.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital
Monday 21.06. 09:45 - 11:15 Digital

Aims, contents and method of the course

The seminar is devoted to current topics in organization theory, specific topics will be announced and assigned in the first unit. In addition to this substantive element, the seminar also serves as a training in writing scientific papers, to prepare you for writing the Master thesis.

Assessment and permitted materials

Students must prepare written papers (in groups of at most two students) and present them to class. A first draft of the paper has to be handed in one week before presentation. Papers may be revised to create a final version (due at the end of the semester) after presentation. For each paper, two discussants will be assigned who have to prepare a brief (about one page) discussion statement on their colleague's work. Active participation in classroom discussion will also be evaluated.

The total score for the course is therefore based on:

Seminar paper (55%)

Presentation (20%)

Discussion paper (15%)

Active participation in discussions (10%)

All papers submitted will be checked for plagiarism and rules the rules published on our homepage will be strictly enforced.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The goal of the seminar is twofold: the substantive goal is to develop insights into central questions of organization theory using current literature. Furthermore, students write and present their own papers based on scientific results, this will prepare them for their work on the master thesis.
50% of the total course points are required to pass the course

Examination topics

Preparation and presentation of student's own papers based on literature, classroom discussion

Reading list

Initial literature will be provided. Students are expected to perform their own literature research and include additional references in their papers.

Group 2

service email address: opim.bda@univie.ac.at

max. 24 participants
Language: English
LMS: Moodle

Lecturers

Classes

FR 16.04.2021 11.30-13.00 Digital (Bestätigt)
DI 29.06.2021 11.30-13.00 Digital (Bestätigt)
FR 02.07.2021 13.15-14.45 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
FR 02.07.2021 15.00-16.30 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
FR 02.07.2021 16.45-18.15 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
FR 02.07.2021 18.30-20.00 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
FR 02.07.2021 20.15-21.30 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
SA 03.07.2021 13.15-14.45 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
SA 03.07.2021 15.00-16.30 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
SA 03.07.2021 16.45-18.15 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
SA 03.07.2021 18.30-20.00 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)
SA 03.07.2021 20.15-21.30 Hörsaal 6 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock (Bestätigt)

Aims, contents and method of the course

Seminar theme: Recruitment, turnover, and retention
Recruiting the best personnel, managing the turnover in a firm’s workforce, and retaining valuable employees and dismissing those who are not belong to the core duties of Human Resources management. Over the course of this seminar, we will discuss recent issues and new developments in these fields. The topic list below provides publications in which the authors address particular problems of interest and their analyses. Student papers and presentations take up these contributions as introductory and guiding literature, while – based on their own literature research – elaborate these issues more comprehensively.
Part I: Recruitment and hiring
I.1. Blatter, Marc, et al. "Hiring costs for skilled workers and the supply of firm-provided training." Oxford Economic Papers 68.1 (2016): 238-257.
I.2. Wenzelmann, Felix, Samuel Muehlemann, and Harald Pfeifer. "The costs of recruiting apprentices: Evidence from German workplace-level data." German Journal of Human Resource Management 31.2 (2017): 108-131.
I.3. Fabel, Oliver, Christian Hopp, and Alexander Speil. "Advice‐seeking and advice‐utilization for hiring decisions: An investigation of a partially outsourced recruitment process for rank‐and‐file managers." Managerial and Decision Economics 41.5 (2020): 784-799.
I.4. Brands, Raina A., and Isabel Fernandez-Mateo. "Leaning out: How negative recruitment experiences shape women’s decisions to compete for executive roles." Administrative Science Quarterly 62.3 (2017): 405-442.
Part II: Job satisfaction and turnover
II.1. Frederiksen, Anders. "Job satisfaction and employee turnover: A firm-level perspective." German Journal of Human Resource Management 31.2 (2017): 132-161.

II.2. Card, David, et al. "Inequality at work: The effect of peer salaries on job satisfaction." American Economic Review 102.6 (2012): 2981-3003.
II. 3. Viñas-Bardolet, Clara, Joan Torrent-Sellens, and Mònica Guillen-Royo. "Knowledge workers and job satisfaction: evidence from Europe." Journal of the Knowledge Economy 11.1 (2020): 256-280.

II.4. Aleksynska, Mariya. "Temporary employment, work quality, and job satisfaction." Journal of Comparative Economics 46.3 (2018): 722-735.
Part III: Retention and dismissal
III.1. Auray, Stéphane, Samuel Danthine, and Markus Poschke. "Understanding the Determination of Severance Pay: Mandates, Bargaining, and Unions." The Scandinavian Journal of Economics 122.3 (2020): 1073-1111.
III.2. Garcia-Louzao, Jose. Workers' Job Mobility in Response to Severance Pay Generosity. No. 76. Bank of Lithuania, 2020.
III.3. Choi, Eunhee, et al. "Understanding work enjoyment among older workers: The significance of flexible work options and age discrimination in the workplace." Journal of gerontological social work 61.8 (2018): 867-886.
III.4. Rombaut, Evy, and Marie-Anne Guerry. "The effectiveness of employee retention through an uplift modeling approach." International Journal of Manpower (2020).

Assessment and permitted materials

The final grade will be calculated as the weighted average of the grades for the seminar paper (40 %), for the presentation (40 %), and for classroom participation (20 %).

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

General information:
(1) There will be a digital introductory meeting of this seminar on 16.04.2021. During this meeting, we will check the topic assignments. Thus, attendance is absolutely necessary. “No-show”-students may be replaced by students registered on the OPIM’s “waiting list” who agree to comply with the seminar rules.
(2) There will be two digital workshops provided by University CTL on scientific research work and academic studying. The session will take place on. 29.06.2021.
(3) Seminar presentations will – anticipating that general law and university regulations allow this procedure by then – take place on site in the faculty building at Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1. These classroom sessions are scheduled from 01.07.2021 to 03.07.2021 in seminar room.
(4) Seminar papers must use 11 pica letter size and one and half line spacing. Papers must be written in English. They must use appropriate citation and reference rules and obey the general ethical principles of scientific work. Students consult the online course directory for information on due-days and deadlines. PDF copies of the seminar papers must be send to the OPIM’s office (to the hands of Ms Elke Pendl, elke.pendl@univie.ac.at) via email.
(5) If two students are assigned to the same topic, they must coordinate on a joint presentation. The “working language” during seminar sessions is English. The maximum time per presentation is 45 minutes for a single presenter and one hour for a joint presentation. The sequence of presentations strictly follows the numbering of topics in the list above. Students are expected to prepare supporting slides and/or hand-outs and to speak “freely” during their presentations.
(6) Every student must individually submit a seminar paper. The seminar paper contains:
- A brief introduction of the seminar’s main theme and line of discussion;
- Sections of one to (maximum) one and half page length which provide an “executive summary” of the classroom presentation, discussion, and base articles (see the above list of papers). The latter constitutes the only source of information if, for whatever reason, a topic cannot be presented and discussed in class.
- A brief concluding section which summarizes the student’s understanding of the seminar discussions.
- A reference list.
Please notice: Any type of copying, including copying from fellow students’ presentation slides and/or seminar papers, constitutes misconduct and will result in receiving the no-pass grade “X”. Direct citations from original scientific work which are properly marked constitute the only exceptions from this rule.
(7) Students are expected to prepare for class. They are required to actively participate in the classroom discussions and should be aware that the lecturer can call upon them for comments at any time during the seminar. In particular, they can be asked to introduce the session’s topic as it relates to the seminar’s general theme.
(8) Complete attendance of each session of the seminar, including the preparatory meeting and the CTL workshops, is obligatory. Absolutely no exceptions apply. In case, internet problems prevent the student’s participation in a digital session, they are required to provide their log-on protocol as proof. Leaves will only be granted in cases of illnesses or if the person demanding a leave is required to participate in an official activity of the University, Faculty, or Institute. In the first case, the doctor’s medical certificate must be presented to the OPIM immediately (i. e. latest by the first working day following the absence day). Failure to comply with this rule leads to a no-pass grade. Passing grades can generally not be earned by students who miss more than 10% of the total class-time.

Examination topics

See literature

Reading list

The topic list below provides publications in which the authors address particular problems of interest and their analyses. Student papers and presentations take up these contributions as introductory and guiding literature, while – based on their own literature research – elaborate these issues more comprehensively.
Part I: Recruitment and hiring
I.1. Blatter, Marc, et al. "Hiring costs for skilled workers and the supply of firm-provided training." Oxford Economic Papers 68.1 (2016): 238-257.
I.2. Wenzelmann, Felix, Samuel Muehlemann, and Harald Pfeifer. "The costs of recruiting apprentices: Evidence from German workplace-level data." German Journal of Human Resource Management 31.2 (2017): 108-131.
I.3. Fabel, Oliver, Christian Hopp, and Alexander Speil. "Advice‐seeking and advice‐utilization for hiring decisions: An investigation of a partially outsourced recruitment process for rank‐and‐file managers." Managerial and Decision Economics 41.5 (2020): 784-799.
I.4. Brands, Raina A., and Isabel Fernandez-Mateo. "Leaning out: How negative recruitment experiences shape women’s decisions to compete for executive roles." Administrative Science Quarterly 62.3 (2017): 405-442.
Part II: Job satisfaction and turnover
II.1. Frederiksen, Anders. "Job satisfaction and employee turnover: A firm-level perspective." German Journal of Human Resource Management 31.2 (2017): 132-161.

II.2. Card, David, et al. "Inequality at work: The effect of peer salaries on job satisfaction." American Economic Review 102.6 (2012): 2981-3003.
II. 3. Viñas-Bardolet, Clara, Joan Torrent-Sellens, and Mònica Guillen-Royo. "Knowledge workers and job satisfaction: evidence from Europe." Journal of the Knowledge Economy 11.1 (2020): 256-280.

II.4. Aleksynska, Mariya. "Temporary employment, work quality, and job satisfaction." Journal of Comparative Economics 46.3 (2018): 722-735.
Part III: Retention and dismissal
III.1. Auray, Stéphane, Samuel Danthine, and Markus Poschke. "Understanding the Determination of Severance Pay: Mandates, Bargaining, and Unions." The Scandinavian Journal of Economics 122.3 (2020): 1073-1111.
III.2. Garcia-Louzao, Jose. Workers' Job Mobility in Response to Severance Pay Generosity. No. 76. Bank of Lithuania, 2020.
III.3. Choi, Eunhee, et al. "Understanding work enjoyment among older workers: The significance of flexible work options and age discrimination in the workplace." Journal of gerontological social work 61.8 (2018): 867-886.
III.4. Rombaut, Evy, and Marie-Anne Guerry. "The effectiveness of employee retention through an uplift modeling approach." International Journal of Manpower (2020).

Association in the course directory

Last modified: We 23.06.2021 13:07