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060040 SE Modern Jewish Thought - An Introduction (2020S)

Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 20.05. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Wednesday 27.05. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Wednesday 03.06. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Thursday 04.06. 14:15 - 15:45 Hörsaal 1 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-25
Wednesday 10.06. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Wednesday 17.06. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Thursday 18.06. 14:15 - 15:45 Hörsaal 1 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-25
Wednesday 24.06. 14:15 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-17
Thursday 25.06. 14:15 - 15:45 Hörsaal 1 Judaistik UniCampus Hof 7 2L-EG-25

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course is a critical survey of the most significant Jewish responses to the experience of the modern era. Beginning with Spinoza's political and hermeneutic thought, we will explore how Jewish thinkers met the social, cultural, and religious challenges of modernity and, in turn, influenced the transformation of modern Jewry. Jewish Thought is understood in a broader sense to include philosophers, religious reformers, and political leaders. Changing and conflicting perspectives on tradition, education, culture, and religion will be in the center of our interest.

The following units will guide the course:
1) Defining the Modern Period for Judaism
2) Spinoza
3) Origins of the Jewish Enlightenment
4) Moses Mendelssohn
5) Emancipation in Progress
6) Religious Reform and Historicism
7) Alternative Models of Reform and Religious Adjustment
8) Nationalism and Dissimilation
9) Reinventing Tradition
10) Judaism as Culture
11) After the Holocaust
12) Contemporary Questions

Format:
Lecture with Discussion. Students are required to prepare short primary texts in advance.

Assessment and permitted materials

Regular attendance, participation, and final exam consisting of three essay questions.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Goal:
Introductory survey of the historical and thematic development of modern Jewish thought, 1670-2000

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:20