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070096 UE Guided Reading Economic and Social History (2021W)

Fashion, Appearance and the Consumption of Clothes in the early modern period

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Continuous assessment of course work
REMOTE

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 04.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 11.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 18.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 25.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 08.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 15.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 22.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 29.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 06.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 10.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 17.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 24.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8
Monday 31.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 41 Gerda-Lerner Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 8

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

As the saying goes, “clothes make the man”. The generally accepted meaning of this saying, which originated in the early fifteenth century, is that what a person wears is taken by others as a signal of status. However, it could also mean that the clothes shape a person’s body, disposition and behavior. Why did this saying originate in the early modern period and what were the specific circumstances that made clothes a defining characteristic of a person at the time? What defined the relation between clothes and status? How did clothes form a person’s appearance and what factors contributed in this process? What was the role of fashion in the formulation of appearance at the time? These are the fundamental questions that form the core of the subject of this course.

The early modern period constituted a critical phase in the development of European dress. It marked the introduction of new products, new technologies and innovations in production and marketing of textiles and clothes. Furthermore, it was the period, in which fashion emerged as a historical phenomenon. Finally, the consumption of clothes was greatly defined by broader fundamental changes in consumption in general during the period.

During the semester, we will examine the social, economic and cultural aspects of dress of the European population in the early modern period. We will observe how the consumption of clothes and the material culture of dress changed in different regions from the Renaissance to the start of the nineteenth century. We will also examine the historical development of fashion and study the changes in the appearance of Europeans in the period with particular focus on the individual parts of dress.

Apart from the main goal of the course, which is to familiarize the students with the history of dress in Europe in the early modern period, the students should learn in this Guided Reading: a) to read, understand and evaluate scientific texts in English, b) to present the texts they read and to criticize them scientifically, and c) to embed the texts in general historical questions and discussions. They should learn to read scientific texts fast and professionally. Additionally, they should train in the discussion on scientific texts and historical sources. The texts should be examined with the intention of revealing the main, core argument, the intentions of the author and the strategies he or she follows. Moreover, the short, written essays will help the students to learn how to formulate a scientific text.

Assessment and permitted materials

Attendance (max. 2 absences)

50% of the grade: Active participation in the discussion

50% of the grade: Writing of short, one-page essays every week

Students can use every aids they want in writing their essays. However no plagiarism is allowed

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Attendance of every session (max. 2 absences)

Absence of more than two sessions without valid reason will result in failing the course

Writing of weekly essays in English (Max. 1 Page). The essays will not be summaries of the texts, but answers to specific questions as stated on the Moodle platform

Writing of every essay (in order to get a perfect score, all essays must be submitted)

Submission of weekly essays by the designated deadline
The failure to submit multiple essays will result in failing the course

Active participation in the discussion

Fulfillment of the role of ‘text expert’ once in the semester. These experts will re responsible to answer initial questions by me on the text and start the discussion. This role must be fulfilled once in the semester in order to pass the course

Points will be allocated to each student after every session according to their essays and participation in the discussion. Their grade will be the result of the sum of the grades of every session. In sessions, in which a student is absent their grade will come only from the submitted essays

Every essay is 1/12 of the grade and so is the discussion in every session

Examination topics

There is no final exam for this course. The students will write weekly essays on the literature that they will have to read every week

Reading list

We will read up to 40 pages of a scientific text in English for every session (journal paper, 1-2 chapters of a book or an article in an edited volume). Moreover, in some sessions small parts of historical sources will be examined.

Short literature list:

Lemire, Beverly. 2016. “A Question of Trousers: Seafarers, Masculinity and Empire in the Shaping of British Male Dress, c. 1600-1800.” Cultural and Social History 13 (1): 1–22.

Lemire, Beverly, and Giorgio Riello. 2008. “East & West: Textiles and Fashion in Early Modern Europe.” Journal of Social History 41 (4): 887–916.

Miller, Lesley Ellis. 2014. “Material Marketing: How Lyonnais Silk Manufacturers Sold Silks, 1660-1789.” In Selling Textiles in the Long Eighteenth Century: Comparative Perspectives from Western Europe, edited by Jon Stobart and Bruno Blondé, 85–98. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Riello, Giorgio. 2013. Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Riello, Giorgio, and Ulinka Rublack, eds. 2019. The Right to Dress: Sumptuary Laws in a Global Perspective, c. 1200-1800. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Roche, Daniel. 1994. The Culture of Clothing: Dress and Fashion in the “Ancien Régime.” Translated by Jean Birrell. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rublack, Ulinka. 2010. Dressing Up: Cultural Identity in Renaissance Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Schäfer, Dagmar, Giorgio Riello, and Luca Molà, eds. 2018. Threads of Global Desire: Silk in the Pre-Modern World. Vol. 1. Pasold Studies in Textile, Dress and Fashion History. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press Pasold Research Fund.

Siebenhüner, Kim, John Jordan, and Gabi Schopf, eds. 2019. Cotton in Context: Manufacturing, Marketing, and Consuming Textiles in the German-Speaking World (1500-1900). Vol. 4. Ding, Materialität, Geschichte. Wien-Köln-Weimar: Böhlau Verlag.

Stöger, Georg. 2014. “Urban Markets for Used Textiles – Examples from Eighteenth-Century Central Europe.” In Selling Textiles in the Long Eighteenth Century: Comparative Perspectives from Western Europe, edited by Jon Stobart and Bruno Blondé, 210–25. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Styles, John. 2007. The Dress of the People: Everyday Fashion in Eighteenth-Century England. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Trentmann, Frank. 2016. Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First. UK: Allen Lane.

Welch, Evelyn. 2005. Shopping in the Renaissance: Consumer Cultures in Italy 1400-1600. New Haven and London: Yale University Press

Association in the course directory

BA Geschichte (2012): Neuzeit, Zeitgeschichte (4 ECTS)
BA Geschichte (2019): Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte (5 ECTS)
BEd UF Geschichte: Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte (4 ECTS)

Last modified: Mo 22.11.2021 14:48