Universität Wien FIND

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070172 UE Methodological course - Introduction to DH: Tools & Techniques (2020W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 06.10. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 13.10. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 20.10. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 27.10. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 03.11. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 10.11. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 17.11. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 24.11. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 01.12. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 15.12. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 12.01. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 19.01. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9
Tuesday 26.01. 09:00 - 10:30 Hybride Lehre
Seminarraum Geschichte 3 Hauptgebäude, 2.Stock, Stiege 9

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Back in 1945, Vannevar Bush, a Director of the US Office of Scientific Research and Development, proposed a device, which he called memex:

> Consider a future device ... in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is mechanized so that it may be consulted with exceeding speed and flexibility. It is an enlarged intimate supplement to his memory. ... The owner of the memex, let us say, is interested in the origin and properties of the bow and arrow. Specifically he is studying why the short Turkish bow was apparently superior to the English long bow in the skirmishes of the Crusades. He has dozens of possibly pertinent books and articles in his memex. First he runs through an encyclopedia, finds an interesting but sketchy article, leaves it projected. Next, in a history, he finds another pertinent item, and ties the two together. Thus he goes, building a trail of many items. Occasionally he inserts a comment of his own, either linking it into the main trail or joining it by a side trail to a particular item. When it becomes evident that the elastic properties of available materials had a great deal to do with the bow, he branches off on a side trail which takes him through textbooks on elasticity and tables of physical constants. He inserts a page of longhand analysis of his own. Thus he builds a trail of his interest through the maze of materials available to him. And his trails do not fade. Several years later, his talk with a friend turns to the queer ways in which a people resist innovations, even of vital interest. He has an example, in the fact that the outraged Europeans still failed to adopt the Turkish bow. In fact he has a trail on it. A touch brings up the code book. Tapping a few keys projects the head of the trail. A lever runs through it at will, stopping at interesting items, going off on side excursions. It is an interesting trail, pertinent to the discussion. ... — The Atlantic, July 1945

The memex machine is often thought of as a precursor of the Internet. Be it as it may, the idea of a personal knowledge device is still of great relevance and of great importance to scholars and scientists whose job is to construct such trails on a regular basis. Needless to say that *historians* will benefit greatly from having such a machine at their disposal. The course will introduce you to basic, intermediate, and some advanced computational techniques, which will allow you to build and maintain your own digital memex machine.

No prior programming experience is expected (we will be learning Python). Each class session will consist in large part of practical hands-on exercises led by the instructor. Laptops are required for the course. We will accommodate whatever operating system you use (Windows, Mac, or Linux), but it must be a laptop rather than a tablet.

Assessment and permitted materials

Course evaluation will be a combination of in-class participation (30%), weekly homework assignments (50%), and the final project (20%).

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Attendance is required; regular participation is the key to completing the course; all students must come with their laptops; homework assignments must be submitted on time (some can be completed later as a part of the final project, but this must be discussed with the instructor whenever the issue arises); the final project must be submitted on time.

Examination topics

There is no examination for the course.

Reading list

- Vannevar Bush, “As We May Think”, The Atlantic, July 1945 Issue <https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1945/07/as-we-may-think/303881/>; <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c539cK58ees>

All necessary materials will be provided via the course website, where you will also find the syllabus and other relevant materials.

Association in the course directory

SP Digital Humanities
MA Geschichte (2014): 3 ECTS
MA Geschichte (2019): 5 ECTS
MA DH: DH-S I

Last modified: Mo 05.10.2020 09:48