Universität Wien FIND

070213 UE Foreign Languages in Historical Science 1 & 2 - History of Globale Migrations (2019W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 7 - Geschichte
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 09.10. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 23.10. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 30.10. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 06.11. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 13.11. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 20.11. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 27.11. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 04.12. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 11.12. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 08.01. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 15.01. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 22.01. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock
Wednesday 29.01. 18:30 - 20:00 Seminarraum 3 Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1 1.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course focuses on various European migration systems in a transatlantic context from the 19th to the 20th century. Regional mobility was always an integral and regular part of a relatively stable social and economic order. The majority of migrants moved across short distances: only a few crossed provincial or international borders, and transatlantic migration remained something of an exception. From the mid 19th century onwards, during the process of industrialization and urbanization, traditional forms of short distance and seasonal mobility increased, while new patterns of transnational migration emerged. The 20th century marks a profound reversal of human movement in Europe and between Europe and the rest of the world. Reading in this course will explore central themes in understanding various European migration patterns and link them to a more global approach, especially via transatlantic migration to the Americas. Issues to be addressed will include economic, social, occupational, family, demographic, and institutional as well as political structures.
The broad aims of the course are to provide the students with an in-depth knowledge of European migration structures within the complex and long-term process by which both rural and urban societies were transformed during modernity. The readings will be examined to identify the main historical themes, methodology and approaches taken in the reconstruction of various regional mobility patterns . As an outcome of the course, it is expected that students will have a broad overview of the literature on European migration and comment and criticize it within historical research.

Assessment and permitted materials

Attendance 10%, participation in discussion 10%, oral presentation 20%, written work 60%.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Following 2-3 explanatory talks by the lecturers, the students, having chosen a theme, will offer their findings in an oral presentation. Following discussions on, and criticisms of their contributions, students will apply a text from the reading list on source material as written essays. There will also be occasional written exercises.
Goals: In general, students will read, study, and discuss a wide variety of English texts on migration and diversity in a transatlantic world.
Performance control: Students have to choose their own topic, have to give an oral presentation and write short texts.

Reading list


Association in the course directory

MA Geschichte: PM4: SP Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte, Globalgeschichte

Last modified: Su 06.10.2019 11:47