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090026 VO History (Byz.) (2018S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 9 - Altertumswissenschaften

Details

Language: German

Examination dates

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 05.03. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 19.03. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 09.04. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 16.04. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 23.04. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 30.04. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 07.05. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 14.05. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 28.05. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 04.06. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 11.06. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock
Monday 18.06. 10:30 - 12:00 Hörsaal d. Inst. f. Byzantinistik u. Neogräzistik, Postg. 7/1/3 3.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The imperial coronation of the Frankish King Charles by the Pope at Christmas of the year 800 marked a significant change in the relations between the Byzantine Empire and the states of Western Europe: Constantinople could assume beforehand that his sole claim to the Roman Empire as the center of the Christian world also in the West was at least formally recognized. Now it was facing a power seeking equality of status. In addition, there were growing differences in the theology and practice of faith between the Eastern and Western Churches, which mingled with the dispute over ecclesiastical spheres of influence between Byzantium and the papacy from southern Italy to Eastern Europe. Economic developments led to the rise of new power factors such as the Italian maritime cities (Venice, Genoa, Amalfi, Pisa), which first sought recognition by Byzantium, but in the course of time became also competitors. At the same time, Byzantium remained a cultural and ideological model, as the distribution of Byzantine objects all the way to Iceland shows. In the 11th century, the geopolitical conditions changed significantly again, as new dangerous opponents emerged with the Normans in southern Italy and the Seljuk Turks in Asia Minor. In particular, however, the First Crusade led to an intensification of contacts, but also of the mutual perception of differences. The relationship between Byzantium and the Crusaders fluctuated between cooperation and conflict, until it finally found a (provisional) dramatic end in the conquest of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204.
These events are discussed in a “global” context of developments in the medieval world. In addition to aspects of political, ecclesiastical and cultural history, questions of social, economic and environmental history are also dealt with on the basis of latest research results. The reading of original texts (in translation) and the use of pictures and maps is intended to give a vivid picture of the role of the Byzantine Empire within High Medieval Europe.

Assessment and permitted materials

Written Exam

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The course offers an introduction to the history of relations between Byzantium and the West as well as current debates of Byzantine and medieval studies. A visit to the exhibition "Byzantium and the West. 1000 forgotten years "at Schallaburg (March-November 2018) is recommended.

Examination topics

The material presented in classes, shared reading and analysis of text sources. Materials for preparation will always be sent electronically to the registered participants in advance of each unit.

Reading list

(a comprehensive bibliography will be distributed at the beginning of the course):
Byzanz und der Rest der Welt. Sonderheft der Zeitschrift Historicum. Linz 2012 (will be sent to all participants as PDF-file).
F. Daim (ed.), Byzanz: Historisch-kulturwissenschaftliches Handbuch. Stuttgart 2016 (with respective chapters on topics of the course)
R.-J. Lilie, Byzanz und die Kreuzzüge. Stuttgart 2004.
P. Schreiner, Byzanz 565–1453 (Oldenbourg Grundriss der Geschichte 22). 4th ed., Munich 2011.
J. Shepard (ed.), The Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire, c. 500–1492. Cambridge 2008.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:31