Universität Wien FIND

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100171 KO Konversatorium (Advanced Exercise Class) History of German Language (2020S)

6.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 10 - Deutsche Philologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 04.03. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 11.03. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 18.03. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 25.03. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 01.04. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 22.04. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 29.04. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 06.05. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 13.05. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1
Wednesday 20.05. 18:30 - 20:00 Hörsaal 1 Hauptgebäude Tiefparterre Stiege 1 Hof 1

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Alle Formen der mündlichen Interaktion sowie physischen Anwesenheit sind für die Zeit des Home-learning in den virtuellen Raum verlagert.

Assessment and permitted materials

- Mündliches Prüfungsgespräch über den Stoff des Semesters (10 Minuten)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

- Mündliches Prüfungsgespräch über den Stoff des Semesters (10 Minuten)

Examination topics

Reading list

Bialystok, E., Craik, F. I. M., Green, D. W., and Gollan, T. H. (2009). Bilingual minds. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 10(3), pp. 89–129.
Bialystok, E. and Kroll, J. F. (2018). Can the critical period be saved? A bilingual perspective. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 21(5), pp. 908–910.
Grosjean, F. (1989). Neurolinguists, beware! The bilingual is not two monolinguals in one person. Brain and Language, 36(1), pp. 3–15.
Haugen, E. (1950). The analysis of linguistic borrowing. Language, 26(2), pp. 210–231.
Haugen, E. (1953). The Norwegian Language in America: a Study in Bilingual Behavior. Vol. I, The Bilingual Community. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Matras, Y. (2009). Language Contact. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Muysken, P. (2010). Scenarios for language contact. In: R. Hickey, ed., The Handbook of Language Contact. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 265–281.
Myers-Scotton, C. (2002). Contact Linguistics: Bilingual Encounters and Grammatical Outcomes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Onysko, A. (2019). Reconceptualizing language contact phenomena as cognitive processes. In: E. Zenner, A. Backus and E. Winter-Froemel, eds., Cognitive Contact Linguistics: Placing Usage, Meaning and Mind at the Core of Contact-Induced Variation and Change, 1st ed. Berlin: de Gruyter, pp. 23–50.
Paap, K. R. and Greenberg, Z. I. (2013). There is no coherent evidence for a bilingual advantage in executive processing. Cognitive Psychology, 66(2), pp. 232–258.
Paul, H. ([1880] 1891). Principles of the History of Language. London: Longmans.
Quist, P. (2008). Sociolinguistic approaches to multiethnolect: language variety and stylistic practice. International Journal of Bilingualism, 12(1-2), pp. 43–61.
Rampton, B. (2011). From multi-ethnic adolescent ‘heteroglossia’ to ‘contemporary urban vernaculars’. Language & Communication, 31(4), pp. 276–294.
Romaine, S. (2005). Language-contact studies. In: U. Ammon, N. Dittmar, K. Mattheier and P. Trudgill, eds., Sociolinguistics / Soziolinguistik. An International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society, 1st ed. Berlin: de Gruyter, pp. 49¬¬–58.
Schmid, H.-J. (2016). Why cognitive linguistics must embrace the social and pragmatic dimensions of language and how it could do so more seriously. Cognitive Linguistics, 27(4), pp. 543–557.
Schmid, M. S., Köpke, B. and de Bot, K. (2013). Language attrition as a complex, non-linear development. International Journal of Bilingualism, 17(6), pp. 675–682.
Schuchardt, H. (1882). Zur afrikanischen Sprachmischung. Das Ausland. Wochenschrift für Länder- und Völkerkunde, 55, pp. 867–869.
Singleton, D. (2005). The critical period hypothesis: a coat of many colours. International Review of Applied Linguistics, 43(4), pp. 269–285.
Singleton, D. and Lengyel, Z. (eds.) (1995). The Age Factor in Second Language Acquisition. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
Singleton, D. and Pfenninger, S. (2018). L2 acquisition in childhood, adulthood and old age: misreported and under-researched dimensions of the age factor. Journal of Second Language Studies, 1(2), pp. 254–275.
Sullivan, M.D. and Bialystok, E. (2017). The importance of bilingualism for the aging brain. In: E. Bialystok and M.D. Sullivan, eds., Growing Old with Two Languages: Effects of Bilingualism on Cognitive Aging, 1st ed. Amsterdam: Benjamins, pp. 1–8.
Tagliamonte, S. A. (2012). Variationist Sociolinguistics: Change, Observation, Interpretation. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
Thomas S. G. and Kaufman, T. (1988). Language Contact, Creolization and Genetic Linguistics. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Weinreich, U. (1953). Languages in Contact. The Hague: Mouton.
Whitney, W. D. (1881). On mixture in language. Transactions of the American Philological Association, 12, pp. 5–26.
Winford, D. (2003). An Introduction to Contact Linguistics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: We 15.12.2021 00:18