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122221 SE Linguistics Seminar / BA Paper (2014S)

Cognitive corpus linguistics

11.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 20 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 19.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 26.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 02.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 09.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 30.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 07.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 14.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 21.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 28.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 04.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 11.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 18.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A
Wednesday 25.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum 6 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-O1-22.A

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The Seminar will introduce students to the basic concepts and tools of corpus linguistics. Issues such as corpus representativity, corpus-based vs. corpus-driven research will be touched upon. The investigated case studies will focus on cognitive linguistic approach to issues such as (1) metaphors, (2) construction grammar and language learning, (3) cognitive sociolinguistics, (4) collocations (5) development of grammatical constructions. The emphasis will be placed on quantitative research methods,including semantic, syntactic and pragmatic features of word uses. Some examples of qualitative corpus analyses will also be discussed.

Assessment and permitted materials

* Attending classes regularly
* Doing the assigned reading (-5% of the final grade for failing to read and understand the assigned material)
* Participation in class discussion
* Fulfilling the in-class tasks (40% of the final grade)
* Writing an essay presenting a small-scale corpus based study (60% of the final grade)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Knowledge:
Students learn what language corpora are and how they are used in linguistic research, in particular in cognitive linguistics.
Skills:
1. Students learn to read academic articles critically.
2. Students practice how to contribute to and or moderate discussions.
3. Students learn how to use basic corpus software (concordancer).
4. Students learn how to write an empirical academic paper in linguistics.

Examination topics

Readings, classroom discussions, in-class tasks, team task, presentation, individual research project

Reading list


Dąbrowska, Ewa. 2009. “Constructing a Second Language. Some Final Thoughts.” Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics 7: 277-290.
Ellis, Nick C. – Teresa Cadierno. 2009. “Constructing a Second Language. Introduction to the Special Section.” Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics 7: 111-139.
Goldberg, Adele E.; Casenhiser, Devin M.; Sethuraman, Nitya. 2004. “Learning argument structure generalizations”. Cognitive Linguistics 15(3): 289-316.
Grady, Joseph E. 2007. “Metaphor.” In: Geeraerts, Dirk – Hubert Cuyckens. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics. Oxford: OUP. 188-213. (you can skip the section on conceptual blending).
Hollmann, Willem B.; Siewierska, Anna. 2011. “The status of frequency, schemas, and identity in Cognitive Sociolinguistics: A case study on definite article reduction”. Cognitive Linguistics 22(1): 25-54.
Johansson-Falck, Marlene and Raymond W. Gibbs. 2012. “Embodied motivation for metaphorical meanings”. Cognitive Linguistics 23(2): 251-272.
Kövecses, Zoltán. 2006. Language, Mind and Culture. A practical introduction. (chapt. 12. The Embodied Mind. The role of Image Schemas. pp. 207-213 –don’t read about Forces in the Mind.)
Newman, John; Rice, Sally. 2004. “Patterns of usage for English SIT, STAND, and LIE: A cognitively inspired exploration in corpus linguistics”. Cognitive Linguistics 15(3): 351-396.
Römer, Ute. 2009. “The inseparability of lexis and grammar. Corpus linguistic perspectives”. Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics 7: 140-162.
Schmidtke-Bode, Karsten. 2009. “going-to-V and gonna-V in child language: A quantitative approach to constructional development”. Cognitive Linguistics 20(3): 509-538.
Stefanowitsch, Anatol. 2006. “Corpus-based approaches to metaphor and metonymy.” (in:) Stefanowitsch, Anatola and Stefan Th. Gries (eds.). Corpus-based approaches to metaphor and metonymy. Berlin / New York: Mouton de Gruyter. 1-16.

Association in the course directory

Studium: UF 344, BA 612
Code/Modul: UF 4.2.3-222, BA06.2
Lehrinhalt: 12-2222

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:33