Universität Wien FIND
Warning! The directory is not yet complete and will be amended until the beginning of the term.

123222 SE Literature Seminar / BA Paper / MA British/Irish/New English (2018S)

Home and Homeland in the British and Anglophone Novel

11.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 18 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 13.03. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 20.03. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 10.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 17.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 24.04. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 08.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 15.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 29.05. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 05.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 12.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 19.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19
Tuesday 26.06. 16:00 - 18:00 Raum 4 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-19

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Home is an auratic term which conjures up a host of associations such as warmth or safety. At the same time, it is notoriously tricky to define because meanings of home are dependent upon social and cultural contexts and individual experientiality. Moreover, home is a multidimensional term as it may refer to a physical structure, e.g. house, a social unit, a place of origins, affective ties or the “site of everyday lived experience” (Avtar Brah). It can also be situated on various scales ranging from the domestic to the global.

In addition, ‘home’ is not a neutral place or a mere descriptive term, as the discussion about the German term ‘Heimat’ has shown in the last few decades. Notions of home are always implicated in ideologies and discursive power relations. Home is therefore a site where subjectivities are forged, practiced and negotiated.

Literature arguably plays an active role in establishing, disseminating and questioning cultural ideas and ideals of home. In the seminar, we will discuss how home is represented in British and Anglophone novels and short stories and how these texts and their textual strategies assess, perform, and re-define home. Here, we will also think about how the novels make us re-think the connection between self, home, and homeland.

Due to the interdisciplinary discussion on home and homeland, the seminar will cover theoretical work from areas like sociology, ethnography, media and cultural studies. As part of the seminar, we will host international specialists who will present their own research and who will work with the seminar group on concrete examples.

Please note: In tandem with the seminar, there is also the lecture series “(Be)Coming Home” (Tuesdays, 6-8 pm) which is recommended to participants as an ideal complement and extension of the seminar discussion.

Assessment and permitted materials

a) Regular attendance and preparation of session material (students may miss two sessions)
b) General participation in class, including individual contributions, work with a partner as well as work in groups
c) Expert work on assigned readings: each student will be assigned to one source material of the syllabus and provide expert input in the respective session
d) A portfolio of three short writing task that prepare you for your term paper
e) A formal paper of 6.500-8.000 words

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

a) Active participation and contributions in class (including your expert input in your respective session): 20%
b) Portfolio Tasks: 30%
c) Term paper: 50%

Students must attain at least 60% of each to pass the course.

Marks in %:
1 (very good): 90-100%
2 (good): 80-89%
3 (satisfactory): 70-79%
4 (pass): 60-69%
5 (fail): 0-59%

Examination topics

- Input phases combined with group work and classroom discussion
- Student input from your expert session
- Students' written research projects (term paper and portfolio)

Reading list

Primary Texts:
Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. “The Thing Around Your Neck.” The Thing Around Your Neck. Collected Short Stories. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. London: Fourth Estate, 2009. 115-127.
Gyasi, Yaa. Homegoing. London: Viking, 2016.
Jones, Lloyd. Mr Pip. New York: The Dial Press, [2007] 2008.
McEwan, Ian. Saturday. London: Vintage, [2005] 2006.
Participants are expected to buy the texts in the editions given above. The short story by Adichie will be provided on moodle.

Theory and Secondary Literature:
Blunt, Alison, and Robyn Dowling. Home. London and New York: Routledge, 2006.
Brah, Avtar. Cartographies of Diaspora: Contesting Identities. London: Routledge, 1996.
Butter, Stella. “Literature and the Making of Home(land): Transnational Fictions of Home in Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip.” Anthropological Journal of European Cultures 23.2 (2014): 119-137.
George, Rosemary Marangoly. The Politics of Home: Postcolonial Relocations and Twentieth-century Fiction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.
Mallett, Shelley. “Understanding home: a critical review of the literature.” The Sociologocial Review 52.1 (2004): 62-89.
Morley, David. Home Territories: Media, Mobility and Identity. London: Routledge, 2000.
Rybczynski, Witold. Home: A Short History of an Idea. New York: Penguin Books, 1986.
Strehle, Susan. Transnational women's fiction: unsettling home and homeland. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
Tuan, Yi-Fu. “Epilogue: Home as Elsewhere.” Heimat: At the Intersection of Memory and Space. Eds. F. Eigler and J. Kugele. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2012. 226–39.

These texts or relevant excerpts from them will be available on moodle at the beginning of term.

Association in the course directory

Studium: UF 344, BA 612, MA 844;
Code/Modul: UF 4.2.4-322, BA10.2, MA4,
Lehrinhalt: 12-0374

Last modified: Fr 31.08.2018 08:42