Universität Wien FIND

127011 KO Critical Readings in Literature (2019S)

Poetics of Migration

6.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 12 - Anglistik
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 13.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 20.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 27.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 03.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 10.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 08.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 15.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 22.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 29.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 05.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 12.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 19.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13
Wednesday 26.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Raum 3 Anglistik UniCampus Hof 8 3E-EG-13

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Migration – the social process of moving from place to place, nation to nation – is something that unsettles meaning and frustrates established social boundaries. In the year 2019, this idea couldn’t be clearer, as the rise of nationalism in Europe and the U.S. coincides with a growing social panic around “refugee crises,” “migrant invasions”, or “demographic changes” – a panic sparked largely by alarmist news media and fear-mongering political leaders. At the same time, this particular political moment has raised debates about the impact of border policies (including asylum programs), national identity, and the historic legacy of globalization - all of which coalesce in a deeper discussion about migration, identity, and place.

In this Critical Readings course, we will examine migration (and, specifically, the political figure of the migrant) through the lens of poetics. ‘Poetics’ in our discussion will operate on two levels: 1.) at the level of poetry and poetic form (obviously), and 2.) as Linda Hutcheon puts it, as “an open, ever-changing theoretical structure by which to order both our cultural knowledge and our critical procedures” (1998: 16). We will examine the ways in which a ‘poetics of migration’ structures - but also destabilizes and re-constitutes - our cultural knowledge and critical procedures in analyzing migration as such, including the dominant modes of political and social representation (e.g. discourse). Throughout the semester, we will be in constant dialogue with different literary texts and poems produced throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. Furthermore, we will examine various critical/theoretical concepts that arise in this discussion, emphasizing the constant exchange between poetics and politics, as well as with migrant identity.

Course outcome:
• Students will be able to identify different critical and theoretical concepts and terms used in analyzing literature and poetry.
• Students will be able recognize literary qualities associated with migrant literature and migrant poetics.
• Students will be able to understand how ‘poetics’, ‘critique’, and ‘theory’ operate as useful scholarly tools within the field of literary and cultural studies.

Assessment and permitted materials

• A short (5-7 minutes) presentation related to one of the primary texts (students are free to choose any topic as long as it relates to the text or author we are discussing for that session).
• Two written tests (mid-term and final).
• An essay of 1.500 words maximum

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Midterm Test= 20 points
Final Test = 20 points
Term Paper=40 points
5-minute presentation= 10 points
Active Participation= 10 points

Total=100 points

Students must receive at least 60 points in order to pass the course.

Grading scale:
1: 100-90p
2: 89-80p
3: 79-70p
4: 69-60p
5: 59-0p

Examination topics

Reading list

Primary Texts
Derek Walcott - Omeros (Please buy full text)
Shailja Patel - Migritude (Please buy full text)
Louise Bennett - "Bans a Killin", "Back to Africa", and "Colonization in Reverse" (available for download on Moodle)
A.K. Ramanujan - "Waterfalls in a Bank", "Chicago Zen," and "Death and the Good Citizen" (available for download on Moodle)

Theory and Secondary Critical Texts
Stuart Hall - "Cultural Identity and Diaspora" (.pdf on Moodle)
Kamau Brathwaite - "Creolization" (.pdf on Moodle)
Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari - "What is Minor Literature?" (.pdf on Moodle)
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak – “Can the Subaltern Speak?” (.pdf on Moodle)

Association in the course directory

Studium: BA 612; BEd 046/407
Code/Modul: BA08.3; BEd Modul 10
Lehrinhalt: 12-3000

Last modified: We 03.07.2019 08:27