Universität Wien FIND
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130091 PS Social History of Literature (PS): The literature(s) of the 'new woman' (2016W)

Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

The session on Thursday, 01.12.2016, probably cannot take place. I hope that we will be able to find a replacement date (possibly an excursion).

Thursday 06.10. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 13.10. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 20.10. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 27.10. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 03.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 10.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 17.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 24.11. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 01.12. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 15.12. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 12.01. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 19.01. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Thursday 26.01. 16:30 - 18:00 Seminarraum 2 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The 'Women's Fiction' discourse can be located in the 18th century and is closely linked to the rise of capitalism and the genealogy of gender difference . Originally the term was used for literature by women, but it gradually served as a synonym for 'trivial literature' by, about and for women. There have been several attempts to nullify such a discriminatory equation of 'Women's' with 'Pulp Fiction' by boosting them with a new meaning. With each feminist wave a (or more than one) 'new Woman's Fiction' developed: towards the end of the 19th century, in the 1920s, in the 1960/70s and in the mid-1990s in the context of the 3rd feminist wave respectively postfeminism the 'Chick lit' genre emerged. Charlotte Roche and Lena Dunham are tipped as authors of a 'New Woman's Fiction' of the forth wave. In the Proseminar we will examine the 'New Woman's Fiction' discourse, which can be understood as a counter-discourse to the mostly pejoratively used term 'Women's Fiction', both from a diachronic and a synchronic perspective. Positions of the Women's movement(s), literary criticism/theory and historiography as well as primary literature - mainly but not exclusively from Anglo-American and German-speaking countries - are to be included. The aim is to show connections between the Women's movement(s) and Woman's Fiction as well as to show the important role of literary criticism and literary history in the production, updating and alteration of discourses.

Assessment and permitted materials

The grading is based on the active and regular attendance in the seminar, on the group presentation, the final written paper (10-15 pages) and other partial performances during the semester.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Good English skills and willingness to engage with feminist literary theory and gender studies.
The minimum requirement for passing the proseminar is the provision of all partial performances during the semester, including a regular attendance (no more than three sessions can be missed) and a positive group presentation, as well as a positive seminar paper (10-15 pages).

Examination topics

Reading list

The literature will be announced in the first session. Purchase/reading recommendation: Virginia Woolf 'A room of one's own' (Free web edition of the University of Adelaide: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/w/woolf/virginia/w91r/)

Association in the course directory

BA M5

Last modified: Fr 31.08.2018 08:51