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140015 VO Race, Gender and Sexuality in African Literature (2017W)

Details

Language: English

Examination dates

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 03.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 10.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 17.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 24.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 31.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 07.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 14.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 21.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 28.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 05.12. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 12.12. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 09.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 16.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Tuesday 23.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Aims (Ziele):
• Identify and analyse the operations of race and gender categories in African nationalist discourses as reflected in Anglophone African literature from Nigeria, Kenya, Zimbabwe and South Africa
• analyse key African literary works in terms of their social and historical context
• apply close reading skills and critical thinking to a variety of literary texts
• reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts

Content (Inhalt): This course will explore the many ways in which “race”, “gender” and “sexuality” have come into being through each other and governed political identities and relationships in (post)colonial Africa, as reflected in African Anglophone and British imperial writing of the last two centuries. “Race”, “gender” and “sexuality” will be seen as interchangeable terms in the patriarchal enterprise of colonialism and the resistance against it, and as over-loaded concepts that continue to impact upon the understanding of what it means to be “African” and who is allowed to hold this identity.
Topics to be discussed include the sexist and racist imagination of British imperial adventure novels; the marginalization of femininity by both colonial and African nationalist discourses; the sexualized perception of mixed-raced identities; the pathologization of gay and lesbian sexuality across Africa; sexual violence against women legitimized by tradition and nationalism; white and albino African identities; the negotiation of black identities in post-apartheid South Africa; and others. Dissident desire will be explored as both a destructive force and a boundary-breaking energy that can redefine both the body and the nation through an imaginary encounter with otherness, leading to creolisation and hybridity. The course will engage with postcolonial, feminist, queer and other literary theories, as well as notions from the history and criticism of African literature in English.

Methods: Lecture and discussion

Assessment and permitted materials

Exam or argumentative essay
Exam will contain YES/NO, multiple choice and open questions
Essay should be 3500-4000 words. Topics will be given to choose from.
4 dates will be fixed for exam or essay submission

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The mark breakdown is as follows:

Excellent (1) 90-100 %
Good (2) 80-89 %
Satisfactory enough (3) 65-79 %
Unsatisfactory (4) 50-64 %
Fail ( 5) 49 -0 %

Assessment criteria for written work:

-Conditions (timely delivery, correct extent, presentable shape, presence of all components of a written work): Here no points can be awarded, but might be deducted!

-Contents (in particular the soundness of the argument, supported with evidence from primary and secondary sources; the ability to read text closely and interpret both form and content; the ability to identify, analyse and understand the context and make connections; the ability to reflect critically on the relations between primary texts and relevant secondary texts, instead of just citing secondary texts as a source of authority and interpretation; clear formulation, structure and organization of the argument; detection of the central points; correctness of methodology; originality; creativity; scope or relevance of the secondary literature used and their methodologically consistent incorporation): Here about 60% of the points will be awarded.

-Format (esp. layout and clarity of presentation; formatting; citation practice; consistency and care): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

-Language (particularly scholarly terminology and correct use of technical terms; clear and understandable language; correct spelling, grammar, and composition; care about style): Here about 20% of the points will be awarded.

In all three areas at least 50% of the points must be achieved in order to obtain credit.

Examination topics

gendered imagination of imperial adventure novels; marginalization of femininity by both colonial and African nationalist discourses; feminist rewritings of African nationalism; dissident desire across race; sexualized perception of mixed-raced identities; African sexuality and marriage traditions in colonial context; the meanings of same-sex sexuality across Africa; sexualization and commodification of the African female body; sexual violence against women legitimized by tradition and nationalism; white and Albino African identities

Reading list

Primary literature:
Novels:
H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon’s Mines (1885)
Sarah Gertrude Millin, God’s Step-Children (1924)
Doris Lessing, The Grass is Singing (1950)
Bessie Head, The Cardinals (1962)
Zoë Wicomb, You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town (1987)
Lewis Nkosi, Mating Birds (1987)
J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1998)
K. Sello Duiker, Thirteen Cents (2000)
K. Sello Duiker, The Quiet Violence of Dreams (2001)
Kopano Matlwa, Coconut (2007)
Chinelo Okparanta, Under the Udala Trees (2015)
Petina Gappah, The Book of Memory (2015)

Memoir:
J. M. Coetzee, Boyhood (2007)

Short stories:
Elleke Boehmer, “Off-white” (2010)
Alexandra Fuller, “Fancy Dress” (2003)
Doris Lessing, “The Great Chief Mshlanga” (1951)

Association in the course directory

ÜAL1, ÜAL2, EC-148;

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:34