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140029 KU Slavery in Africa in the 19th and 20th century (2009W)

Continuous assessment of course work

Vorbesprechung: 06.10.2009!

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 06.10. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 13.10. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 03.11. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 10.11. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 17.11. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 01.12. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 15.12. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06
Tuesday 12.01. 17:00 - 20:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 2 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-06

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

In this course, students will be introduced to discussions of theoritical definitions of slavery in using a comparative perspective: what is a slave? What is freedom? We will confront Western concepts of slavery and freedom to African realities. We will also examine the concepts of exploitation, marginality, resistance and agency by analysing case studies and original sources. Besides, students will be made aware of the highly gendered aspect of slavery: male and female slaves experienced slavery very differently. We will higlight the changing nature of African slavery over the centuries and more specifically analyse the consequences of the Atlantic Slave trade, the colonial conquest and abolitionism. Finally, the course will examine the end of slavery and the legacy of slavery in post-abolitionist Africa.

Assessment and permitted materials

Oral presentation, critical reading, short Essay, Final Examination, regular attendance and active participation in the discussion.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Overview and analysis of the concept of slavery in the sub-Saharan African context from a long term perspective;

Examination topics

1. Analysis of original sources on slavery
2. Confrontation of the theoretical framework of slave studies with the historical and cultural diversity of Africa

Reading list

Falola, Toyin et Paul E. Lovejoy, eds. (1994) Pawnship in Africa, Debt Bondage in Historical Perspective. Oxford: Westview Press.
Klein, Martin A. (1989) "Studying the History of Those Who Would Rather Forget: Oral History and the Experience of Slavery" History in Africa 16, pp. 209-217.
Klein, Martin A. (1998) Slavery and Colonial Rule in French West Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Klein, Martin A. et Richard Roberts (1980) "The Banamba Slave Exodus of 1905 and the Decline of Slavery in the Western Sudan" Journal of African History 21, pp. 375-394.
Miers, Suzanne et Martin Klein (1999) Slavery and Colonial Rule in Africa. London: France Kass.
Miers, Suzanne et Igor Kopytoff, eds. (1977) Slavery in Africa. Historical and Antropological Perspectives. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press.
Miers, Suzanne et Richard Roberts (1988) The End of Slavery in Africa. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press.
Meillassoux, Claude (1986) Anthropologie de l'esclavage : le ventre de fer et d'argent. Paris: PUF.
Robertson, Claire et Martin A. Klein, eds. (1983a) Women and Slavery in Africa. Madison: The University Press of Wisconsin.

Association in the course directory

GA.KU.1 (GA.2), T II

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:34