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140177 UE Sanskrit readings in the philosophical-religious traditions of South Asia (2017S)

Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 24 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 02.03. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 09.03. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 16.03. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 23.03. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 30.03. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 06.04. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 27.04. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 04.05. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 11.05. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 18.05. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 01.06. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 08.06. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 22.06. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34
Thursday 29.06. 10:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum 5 ISTB UniCampus Hof 4 2C-O1-34

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Contents:
In European languages there has historically been an inextricable connection between writing and literacy: a literatus, an intellectual, was “literate” exactly because he knew how to read, write and interpret letters, i.e., written language. By contrast, in South Asia and more specifically in the brahmanical traditions, the oral transmission of knowledge has been more dominant and the written form of texts has been relatively neglected. Yet, just as works composed in other languages, Sanskrit works are available to us mostly because of their transmission in a written form.
The course will consist of reading exercises of a selection of Sanskrit passages from Jayanta’s Nyāyamañjarī (ninth century CE), as well as a short passage from Rājaśekhara’s Kāvyamīmāṃsā (tenth century), mostly in prose. Jayanta is known for his lucid and eloquent prose, which is in itself the ideal ground for reading exercises at the MA level.
The selected passages concern emic views on the transmission of knowledge, on the epistemic value of written texts, and on practical aspects of writing. In addition, we will also look at two manuscripts from the 13th and the 15th centuries, for further evidence on practical, social and historical aspects of transmitting knowledge by writing.
During our reading sessions we will seek answers to queries such as the following ones: Are “written words” actually words? Can they be regarded as an independent source of knowledge? Do a written instruction and a spoken instruction have the same epistemological status and the same effect on the reader or listener? Why did many ancient authors despise writing as a lowly practice? What was the intended audience of the written texts?

Goals:
Improving one’s reading skill of scholarly Sanskrit texts.
Reflecting over the social and cultural context of the production of Sanskrit texts.
Understanding the different function of Sanskrit manuscripts, editions, and critical editions.

Assessment and permitted materials

Evaluation and attendance:
The evaluation will be based on both oral and written performances. The oral performance will consist of the regular and active participation during the exercises, which should be based on the preparation of the Sanskrit texts and on the study of the recommended secondary literature. Moreover, during the course each student shall make a short presentation on a topic to be planned with the lecturer. The written part will include some minor homework and a written test at the end of the course. The oral and the written performances will determine, respectively, each 50% of the evaluation.
The attendance is compulsory, so students who miss more than three meetings cannot be eligible for a positive evaluation.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list

Graheli, A., ed. (c). History and Transmission of the Nyāyamañjarī. Critical Edition of the Section on the Sphoṭa. Vienna: Verlag Der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaen.
Dalal, C. D. and Shastry, A., eds. Kāvyamīmāṃsā of Rājaśekhara. Baroda: Central Library, 1916
Kelly, J. (2006). “Writing and the State: China, India, and General Definitions”. In: Margins of Writing, Origins of Cultures. Ed. by Seth L. Sanders. Vol. 2. Oriental Institute Seminars. Chicago: The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, pp. 15–32.
Mohanty, J. N. (1994). “Is There an Irreducible Mode of Word-Generated Knowledge?” In: Knowing from Words. Ed. by Bimal Krishna Matilal and Arindam Chakrabarti. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
Pollock, S. (1998). “The Cosmopolitan Vernacular”. In: Journal of Asian Studies 57.1, pp. 6–37.
Saksena, S. K. (1951). “Authority in Indian Philosophy”. In: Philosophy East and West 1.3, pp. 38–49.
K.S. Varadacarya, ed. (1969-1983). Nyāyamañjarī: with Ṭippaṇī Nyāyasaurabha. 2 vols. Mysore:

Association in the course directory

MASK6a (UE A)-PR

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:34