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Warning! The directory is not yet complete and will be amended until the beginning of the term.

140362 SE VM8 / VM1 - Global Health and Development (2016W)

Continuous assessment of course work
SGU

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 11.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 25.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 08.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 22.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 06.12. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 10.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1
Tuesday 24.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Seminarraum SG2 Internationale Entwicklung, Sensengasse 3, Bauteil 1

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The aim of the course is to introduce students to contemporary literature on global health and development with a particular focus on the extent and causes of inequalities in population health between and within countries. The concepts of economic wealth and health will be explored taking historical factors into consideration. Students will have a chance to review and discuss the impact of more than US$30 billion spent annually in external development assistance for improving health. The instructors will share their own field experiences in development.

The course consists of assigned readings (English texts), short lectures by instructors, presentations by students and guided in-class discussions.

Assessment and permitted materials

Regular attendance, written assignments and presentations.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

A basic background in economics, politics and statistics is an advantage. A good command of written and spoken English is required. Guidance will be given how to read effectively and efficiently.

Examination topics

The course is divided into three parts. Part I describes and documents changes in global health since the start of industrial revolution. Focuses will be on: the extent of present-day health inequalities between and within countries; and technical challenges involved in measuring population health and health inequality. Part II examines the major factors that influence population health including economic and political development and the forces associated with globalization. Part III considers whether external development assistant has been mostly helpful – or possibly harmful – in improving population health in low income countries and in lessening health inequalities.

Students will be assessed base on: regular attendance, active participation in class, short papers (<2 pages) and/or presentation on assigned readings and topics; and 1 long paper (<20 pages).

Reading list

Angust Deaton, The Great Escape: Health, Wealth and the Origins of Inequality. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013.

Randall M. Pakard, The Making of a Tropical Disease. Baltimore. MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007.

Paul Farmer et al., Reimagining Global Health. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2013 – selected chapters.

Journal articles, book chapters, and other relevant materials.

Association in the course directory

VM1, VM8

Last modified: We 21.04.2021 13:31